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Tomo

Chelsea Transfer Pub

Started by Tomo,

11,026 posts in this topic
35 minutes ago, Atomiswave said:

You rate Camavinga above Rice Vesper, havent seen much of him to be honest so cant judge.

different types of players

Camavinga is a unique player

super athletic and technical

can play almost anywhere

would not be shocked it he was a cracking left fullback as well

but for sure he can play

DMF (both trad and deep holding)

Roaming destroyer in a double pivot (like Kante, but Camavinga is bigger, far better passer, far better shooter)

CMF

AMF

RMF and LMF

RW/LW (he is left footed but almost ambipedal)

hell Rennes even played him a false nine for a spell in one game I saw

 

Rice would be a partner for Camavinga (ie taking Zakaria's place, UNLESS Rice is moved to CB <<< a Rice and Upamecano CB pairing could be amazing in theory)

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23 minutes ago, Vesper said:

different types of players

Camavinga is a unique player

super athletic and technical

can play almost anywhere

would not be shocked it he was a cracking left fullback as well

but for sure he can play

DMF (both trad and deep holding)

Roaming destroyer in a double pivot (like Kante, but Camavinga is bigger, far better passer, far better shooter)

CMF

AMF

RMF and LMF

RW/LW (he is left footed but almost ambipedal)

hell Rennes even played him a false nine for a spell in one game I saw

 

Rice would be a partner for Camavinga (ie taking Zakaria's lace, ULESS Rice is moved to CB <<< a Rice and Upamecano CB pairing could be amazing in theory)

Thanks

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This is what we needed.

And speaking of DMs I watched Hoffenheim:Red Star last night and Samassekou is really good player, not sure about top level but one to watch.

 

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4 hours ago, Vesper said:

Double Pivot  Zakaria and Camavinga

I've only seen youtube videos of Camavinga but I've been unimpressed so far. I'm off to seek out more videos.

Vesper and mkh like this

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FEATURE | Was Houssem Aouar ready to move to a big European club this summer?

https://www.getfootballnewsfrance.com/2020/feature-was-houssem-aouar-ready-to-move-to-a-big-european-club-this-summer/

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Despite a middling run of form in a disjointed Lyon side, Houssem Aouar continued to be an in-demand presence in Europe as the transfer market lurched towards its close on Monday. Persistently linked with Arsenal, and, to a lesser degree, Juventus, over the summer, the midfielder has lately also become the subject of interest from Paris Saint-Germain, and even Real Madrid, per the latest L’Équipe. The Spanish club’s initial interest in Les Gones’ academy product was centred around a deal potentially being concluded next summer, with Aouar having a noted admirer in Zinedine Zidane and the club having made no major purchases this summer, might this latest twist have legs? 

Aouar is several years younger than any of Isco, Toni Kroos, or Luka Modric, and while he certainly needs no small amount of polishing, his versatility could make his signing a major filip. Some saw this late-breaking interest, and that of the capital side as being a smokescreen on the part of Aulas, hoping to drive Arsenal to the brink of desperation, but what is more pertinent is what sort of player these clubs would have gotten. That is, is Aouar of the requisite quality to be a vital cog at one of Europe’s biggest clubs? The answer is a rather complex one, and while a definitive opinion can be difficult to form, having seen him play something in the neighbourhood of a hundred times, the jury remains somewhat out, even if this verdict is through (largely) no fault of the player.

A native of the Lyon area, Aouar came through the ranks without much fanfare, avoiding the sort of hype that has accompanied teammates of his such as Rayan Cherki. A peripheral figure during his initial appearances, in 2016/17, the sale that summer of Corentin Tolisso to Bayern Munich appeared to open the door to the first team for the youngster, but it also marked the start of a quandary that continues to plague those who would observe him up until the present moment.

The all-action Tolisso had been a bit of a Swiss Army knife for Lyon, slotting in at right back, or even as second striker, but his best position was in central midfield. Never an orthodox defensive midfielder, Tolisso benefited from playing alongside the likes of Maxime Gonalons or Lucas Tousart, players whose gritty physicality would allow him far more freedom while still taking advantage of his own power and ability on the ball.  

The next campaign, however, saw Gonalons depart, and while Tousart was still available to do the yeoman’s share of the work in protecting the defence, the role that Aouar was thus asked to play alongside either the former Valenciennes man or Tanguy N’Dombele was often a fairly negative one. Lyon played both a 4-2-3-1 and a 4-3-3 that season – the former formation most often saw Nabil Fékir playing as a ten, limited Aouar’s ability to truly be involved in the attack, while the latter, with a midfield trio of Tousart, Aouar, and Ndombele did nominally allow the academy product more freedom, the slide rule passing of Ndombele meant that Aouar was often relegated to a shuttling role.  

Undaunted, he dug in his heels, and used his deceptively wiry strength to become a more than creditable option in his new role, while still managing to record a half dozen goals, most of them sublime finishes coming as the product of wonderful interplay among Fékir, Ndombele and Mariano Diaz. While the attention as regards to Lyon’s attack that season was squarely on the team’s front four, Aouar’s opportunism and craft at making late-breaking runs into the box was something to behold. With Fékir’s spirit and battling energy the model, the club won nine of their last ten league matches to qualify for the Champions’ League, and Aouar, despite being just nineteen, had shown enough, without stealing the show, to suggest that he would be a fixture for years to come.

It was more of the same in 2018/19, as Aouar improved both his goal and assist figures, thriving despite near-constant tactical tinkering on the part of then-manager Bruno Génésio. His relationship with Fékir continued to improve, and new signing Moussa Dembélé also benefitted from Aouar’s creativity, shaking off a slow start to finish with fifteen goals in the league. Lyon were far from perfect, but the team had a vibrancy and energy about them, and, backed by a sparkling new arena and investment from a Chinese group, seemingly the means to progress even further, no small matter as both Marseille and Monaco seemed to be at a low ebb at the time.

The summer of 2019 would be a fateful one, however. The embattled Génésio’s departure was unsurprising – he was a product of the club through and through, but had always seemed more adept at a needs must style of management rather than orchestrating any sort of brilliant football. Fékir’s move away was more surprising, but after his previous attempt to go to Liverpool had fallen through, perhaps the horse had already left the barn when it came to the captain’s ability to focus on the task at hand.

However, with Fékir gone, the team’s focal point in attack became not the unselfish and scrappy number ten, but rather Depay, whose best position is either as a striker or wide on the left, but whose approach to play is one of single-mindedness. Never one to rejoice in being a creative force, the Dutchman increasingly set off on maddening runs down blind alleys, and the form of those around him, including Dembélé, but also Aouar suffered. 

With Depay running amok and new sporting director Juninho’s pick for manager, Sylvinho, in over his head on the bench, Lyon were in dire form and there were already rumours linking the club’s most illustrious talents with moves away, punctuated by Tousart’s departure to Hertha Berlin in the winter window. Lyon continued to stutter in the league, but a Coupe de la Ligue final run and, of course, the team’s surge into the Champions League semifinals did much to paper over the cracks.

Now, however, back to the grey reality of Ligue 1, Lyon look bereft of ideas under Rudi Garcia, and Aouar appears to have followed the lead of Depay in terms of the selfishness of his play. Lyon had last season been over-reliant on individual brilliance to win them matches, and this season has been more of the same, but with poorer results as French sides have been largely able to keep Les Gones and Aouar at bay. 

Is this to say, then, that Aouar is a busted flush, the influence of Depay and his flash (both on and off the pitch) having subsumed the hardworking young talent who was ready to give his all no matter what position he was asked to play? No, and emphatically so. The talent of the player remains, but the floundering project under Juninho, both in terms of the coaching personnel and the squad, which has dramatically moved away from having a sense of cohesion both and off the pitch, has done Aouar a massive disservice as he’s jammed into a variety of positions that are ill-suited.

Played under a manager who has a consistent and clear tactical plan, and alongside teammates who don’t feel that they have to take on the world, or at least the entire defence, alone, there is every reason to believe that Aouar can get back to the upward track he was seemingly on little more than a year ago. While it may take some time for his progress to resume, the player that dazzled despite difficult circumstances is still there, and were he to move to a club in a more stable and patient situation come to fruition, there is little doubt that he can become the breakout star that many had glimpsed some three years ago.

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12 minutes ago, OhForAGreavsie said:

I've only seen youtube videos of Camavinga but I've been unimpressed so far. I'm off to seek out more videos.

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Eduardo Camavinga

Eduardo Camavinga tactical analysis scout report tactics

https://totalfootballanalysis.com/article/tactical-analysis-eduardo-camavinga-scout-report-tactics

An extraordinary teenager came to world’s sight in the summer of 2019 after the exquisite performance against Paris Saint Germain in Ligue 1, and the footballing auditorium questioned who’s the guy dancing between highly-paid midfielders?

The name was Eduardo Camavinga, and the youngster born in Angola but raised in France played toe to toe versus Marco Verrati, Marquinhos and Angel di Maria in the midfield and sent them home with zero points in their pockets. That game pointed him out as the next big thing in the country of world champions, as he, not long after that, got to represent them in the U21 squad.

He’s seen as the successor of today’s midfield that brought „Les Bleus“ back to the top because of his physical and technical abilities along with his understanding of the play. The 17-year-old entered the Rennes first team this year and stuck in it with his great performances, week in week out showing that he deserves dithyrambs that are served on him. Even though he is planned to step into the boots of N’Golo Kanté, Paul Pogba and Blaise Matuidi, he’s the mixture of all three of them and his career could easily go through plenty of different paths.

Camavinga is a two-way midfielder with characteristics of the modern best players in that position. His age gives him even more value because although he is very young, he already has some major qualities that put him on the biggest teams’ shortlists for the upcoming transfer windows.

His side managed to win against some tough opponents in both the domestic league and in Europe this season, with the youngster playing a huge part in those duels. It is important to acknowledge his maturity of ideas and sense for the game when talking about his potential, so he will probably become one of the bests out there if he keeps working hard and continues his progress this way.

But, what’s the fuss about Eduardo Camavinga?

Movement and play organisation

The French midfielder is an embodiment of the modern football-control idea in that part of the pitch. He plays as a true metronome, building the actions for his team and organising the central areas in the way he sees them. That is possible because of his great motions in his space of manoeuvring, as he is always close to the action in the zones for which he is in charge.

Camavinga works all around the field, focusing himself on the midfield but floating in a non-strict manner and positioning both in higher half-spaces and coming closer to his goal in order to be included in the build-up.

marko-jovi%C4%87-1.png

As we can see in his heat map, the youngster is mostly present in the central square of the pitch where he participates in all of his duties. His higher movements are also related to the pressing game and fake runs, which he uses to create room to his teammates in the danger zones.

The main job of this player is to be included in the opening stages of the attacks and to organise them in the following ones. His positioning in those situations is on a very high level and he very often finds the room between the lines to break the opposition’s pressing. The defensive midfielder comes close to his defenders when they are in possession and repeats good gap-runs which enable his team to move forward.

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Camavinga’s body positioning and movement make it possible for Rennes to play across the pitch in under-pressure situations. He time and again uses the blind spots of the opponents to run into the space in which he can get the ball so he could organise the progression of his team’s play.

When it comes to higher zones, his involvement in actions remains the same in some manner, but in some quite difficult. In the central area of the pitch, he is the main rhythm-controller due to his vision and sense for the play because he knows when to overload and when to switch the side if one gets overcrowded.

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In the scenario as the one shown above, the youngster notices that the ball can’t go through the right-hand side because of the numerical inferiority of his team so he rationally decides to send the ball to the opposite one. His fast feet enable him to repeat those actions and not to panic under pressure since he possesses good technique and great ball control, which can be seen in his fast receptions and turns with the ball.

Camavinga is not only useful with the ball in his feet, but also with his fake movements. He opens a lot of space for his teammates in various areas of the pitch by performing dummy runs in order to get the defenders’ attention.

marko-jovi%C4%87-4.png

His constant motions are of great importance for his side and he frequently makes it possible for them to organise their actions even though he isn’t physically included in the possession. The midfielder opens a lot of passing lanes with his runs and allows players in a better position to get the ball.

Although he is mainly positioned in the midfield square, he now and again has a tendency to pull himself to the flank in order to initiate fast-forward plays. As he is very good in both negative and positive transitions, his pace allows him to participate in counter-attacks in which he often finds himself next to the sidelines.

marko-jovi%C4%87-5.png

Those repeated runs speed up Rennes’ game and help them break the lines easier. From these positions, Camavinga mostly decides to go with deeper passes or to try and find his teammate in the central or inner corridor.

Sometimes, he also plays an important role in the final third of the pitch when he comes closer to the action to provide his team with an extra-option. The youngster senses the gaps in the opponent’s defensive structure and habitually tries to utilise them by coming closer and supplying his attackers from those spaces.

marko-jovi%C4%87-6.png

In the picture above it is shown how the Frenchman makes the best of this scenario setting himself in a great position to get the ball and sending a fast pass to his player in the half-space at the edge of the box. This link-up quality he has is a good indicator of what he can become in the future, as it is a good basis for him to progress in that way and become an all-round midfielder.

Playing under pressure and tempo-dictating

Camavinga is quite cold-blooded for his age and he doesn’t panic when he gets in difficult situations with no clear winning outcome in his sight. He manages to think maturely in those settings and finds the optimal solution, thriving under pressure and being secure on the ball.

His stats in the passing section are impressive if we perceive him as a defensive midfielder with an attacking attitude. Although he likes to move upwards, he controls the play by sending a huge number of balls to the flanks or backwards and his numbers clearly show that he balances the actions of his team with his well-picked passes.

marko-jovi%C4%87-7.png

The youngster is versatile in his decisions and uses various passes in order to dictate the tempo of play. As we can see, he has a high pass accuracy rate of 89% and all of the other percentages in this segment of the game are higher than 70% and yet well-balanced.

His vision and sense for the game make it possible for him to control the rhythm of the matches as he is really good at noticing the environment around himself. Camavinga’s decisions are mostly perfectly timed and he usually passes only to teammates in the best positions to receive them.

marko-jovi%C4%87-8.png

In the picture, it is shown how he commands Rennes’ action by observing the setting around him and playing it towards the best-suited player at that moment. The Frenchman time and again gets the good insight of the situation so he decides if his team will move quickly or play it slower and circle the block. He sees the numerical inferiority and sends the ball to the opposite side which allows his team to progress through the unguarded part of the pitch.

The 17-year-old doesn’t have issues when he’s put under pressure by numerous opponents, and manages to keep his cool, mostly due to good ball-control skills and on-the-ball secureness. Even when he’s faced towards his own goal, he knows how to beat guards who have a surplus over him and is quite lucid in those situations, as he often tries to beat them with dribbling.

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Camavinga frequently thrives in those scenarios making the most for his team and opening good counters or transitive attacks. He is familiar with conquering space with the ball in his feet and, because he is good under pressure, doesn’t run away from direct play against numerically superior opponents. The midfielder also often finds a way to move the ball forward from these restricted areas and manages to supply his attackers in fast transitions.

marko-jovi%C4%87-10.png

However, those actions aren’t the most common ones for him because he mostly decides to go with a fast passing game in order to dictate the play. He oftentimes finds himself pressurised and that happens in various zones on the field – in the opening stages of the actions as much as in higher progressive ones.

In all of the areas, the pattern of his decisions stays the same – his vision allows him to pick the best possible solution and to break the opponent’s structure with just one pass enabling his side to move towards the goal.

 

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As we can see, settings as the one above are frequent for Camavinga, but he doesn’t panic and manages to find the open player on the other side so their attack can continue down the left-handed flank. His calmness on the ball when the opponents are heading for him indicates that he is well-drilled both in his head and his feet and that he could, if he isn’t already, become a high-level action opener.

Covering depth and providing support

Playing with the ball isn’t the only thing this youngster does well as his out of possession game is also of high quality. Camavinga is preferably the defensive midfielder who likes to control the situation in the central zones of the pitch and who tends to position himself in front of the ball and as security providing midfielder to his teammates who are positioned higher up the pitch.

His main job is to play as a second line of defence in the midfield, providing extra help if the first line gets broken and supporting his team’s players if they need him to press together with them. He always stays close to the action, watching for the closest opponents and staying on a reasonable distance from them so he can approach them with speed and regain possession for his side.

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In the picture above, Camavinga stays in support behind his two teammates and watches their backs whilst also covering the two attackers. He is very good in covering depth because he is very disciplined in positioning and doesn’t often leave his position. His team can always count on him sitting back behind the first line of defence controlling the block and covering gaps between the lines.

As the second line of defence, he picks up a lot of breakthrough balls because he is good in “1v1” duels and sticks close to the action. Even though opponents manage to pass through the first part of his team’s pressing, he’s often there to provide correction and win the ball back.

marko-jovi%C4%87-13.png

We can see how he manages to come to the zone close to his teammates in order to regain possession with his perfect timing and aggressiveness. Also, he continues to keep an eye on the player in the midfield, staying alerted if he gets the pass and being on standby if that happens.

The same pattern repeats if the player decides to dribble through the first midfield pressing line, as he continues to provide support and be close to them so he could get away with the clear ball or win the second ball.

marko-jovi%C4%87-14.png

Camavinga is a disciplined player that moves constantly and covers a lot of space vertically across the pitch. He provides those kinds of helpful runs both on the flanks and in the central areas so he makes the pressing job easier for Rennes.

When it comes to negative transitions, the youngster is pacey and comes deeper to participate in the low-stage defending. His role is, as in the most of the other situations, to cover depth and to cut down the passing lane to the midfielders in central and inner corridors, which he does regularly.

marko-jovi%C4%87-15.png

Those settings are possible because of his good communication with the defenders. He manages to keep firm links with them and to be close enough to both the action and the player he needs to guard, maintaining the shape of his team’s transitive system. Although he sometimes forgets himself and doesn’t repeat those runs, that can be accredited to his age and can be seen as the segment of the game in which he can easily become better in the future.

Conclusion

Watching France flourish through the last decade it is clear that they set the grounds for the upcoming generation of players that will fill up the shoes of the likes of Pogba, Griezmann, etc. Their main catalyst in the upcoming years will surely be Kylian Mbappé, but he will have great support in Eduardo Camavinga who is a true embodiment of a modern midfielder.

His on-the-ball skills are in great balance with his out of possession play and he is already a well-built player, yet with a lot of room to fulfil his potential. The youngster’s idea of football is astonishing and the way he dictates matches point him out as the next big thing in the world of the midfield-action.

If he continues to progress this way, he will become one of the hottest players France has had in this millennium mixing in himself qualities of Patrick Viera and Blaise Matuidi. That’s just a comparison you’d love to be part of.

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Player Analysis: Why every European giant is interested in Eduardo Camavinga?

https://www.sports-nova.com/2020/06/10/player-analysis-why-every-european-giant-is-interested-in-eduardo-camavinga/

Lille OSC v Stade Rennais - Ligue 1 : News Photo

On 19th August, 2019, Rennes played Paris Saint Germain in a home fixture of the Ligue 1. It’s always an easy decision to bet that the winners would be Paris Saint Germain. But, that day, a youngster from the youth academy of Rennes, named Eduardo Camavinga, had different plans.

The starlet made fools out of the opposition midfielders. Facing off against world class players like Angel di Maria, Marco Verratti and Marquinhos, the youngster didn’t lack a bit of confidence and was full of determination to send the visitors home with no points. Rennes won the match and Eduardo Camavinga won our hearts and the interests of various big clubs, including Real Madrid and Manchester United.

Making his debut for Rennes at the age of 16 marks him as one of the youngest footballers to make his professional debut and after his unmatched performances for the club, Camavinga won his international U-21 debut for France on 11th November, 2019.

With a string of excellent games to his name, he proved his consistency as well. He has been a regular for the club from the day he made his professional debut. Replacing an experienced midfield isn’t that easy but for Camavinga, it is no big deal. Touted to be successor of Blaise Matuidi in the French national team, the 17 year old has the potential to get much bigger than each of the current French regular midfielders. His vision, ball control, passing ability, technique, understanding of the game and his physical stature are his major attributes at the age. With time, Eduardo Camavinga can develop into the best midfielder in the world. Real Madrid have shown major interest in the youth sensation.

Rennes are not a major force in the Ligue 1 but this season has been a dream run with them placed 3rd when the Ligue 1 season was forced to end. The major reason behind this success is none other than the talented midfielder.

Rennes plays in a 5-3-2 formation with Camavinga as the central midfielder. Rennes’s attacking system involves the use of the two wing-backs high up the pitch and the right and left central midfielders moving high up the pitch to support the system. Camavinga doesn’t move high up the pitch. With the physical and defensive qualities he possesses, it’s obvious to use him in the defence. He is an excellent interceptor and has a good sense of positioning. He efficiently cuts down passing lanes and actively engages in duels. Sometimes, we get to see another side of the system. With the wing-backs down deep, Camavinga is allowed to move high up the pitch. The side central midfielders move wider and this is when we get to experience the explosiveness of the prodigy.

An excellent dribbler, possessing great passing range and ball control, he is the powerhouse of the team. His defensive and attacking work rate is too good. His only flaw is his shooting. However, we don’t expect too many goals from a midfielder starting deep, he needs to improve on that to become one of the most complete players in the world.

SS Lazio v Stade Rennes: Group E - UEFA Europa League : News Photo

Movement and play organisation:

Eduardo Camavinga engages highly in the centre of the pitch. He positions himself in places higher up the pitch to take out the opposition midfielders. This, in turn, creates his teammates room to attack the half spaces to break the opposition structure. Camavinga starts building up the game deep down the field. Moving higher up the pitch, he also makes fake runs to create space, and also presses aggressively, to force the opposition to make mistakes because Camavinga’s teammates cover the half spaces.His excellent positioning helps find the space between the lines to break the opposition’s pressing.

Camavinga’s fluid movement and vision helps him to find the most flawed area of the opposition midfield and he continuously exposes them. He is too mature for his age and he controls the midfield to his tunes. He dictates the overload on either side and always is involved in switching the play to either sides. Camavinga remains calm and composed before making a pass, even in the most stressful situations. He doesn’t crack under pressure. This makes his passes accurate and timed. His random runs high up the pitch opens up passing lanes and it also garners attention, which helps in the other players with space and time.

The youngster is fast as well, and often moves to the flanks to control overload. His pace helps initiate quick counter attacks as well. When the wing-backs are deep, Camavinga opts to move to the final third to use the space left behind by the opposition midfielders as they move back to cover the other players.

Eduardo doesn’t usually go for long balls because of the system he plays in. But his short passing is rather dangerous and can split open defences. He likes to play the ball to the wider players to use the flanks. His decision making and wide array of passes control the flow of the game.

Montpellier Vs Stade Rennes. French Ligue 1, Regular Season. : News Photo

Camavinga’s vision and calmness helps him choose the best possible passing option and thus, he manages to make passes and that destroys the opposition defensive structure. He covers a lot of area of the pitch, which sees him operating as a support for his attacking teammates as well as a defensive midfielder dropping deep between the centre backs at times. He picks up a lot of duels, from which he wins back the ball.

Another point to add is Camavinga’s ball skills. With a huge arsenal of silky touches and feints, it is a cherry on top of his other qualities.

France has had various extraordinary talents over the years. Eduardo Camavinga has the potential to become one of the best talents of France ever. Currently, Camavinga is perhaps the most complete midfielder under the age of 25!

Though he has been touted to become the next Matuidi, Pogba, Kante or Tigana, I consider him the heir to the throne of Frank Rijkaard, given the qualities he possesses.

 

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So, Zakaria will probably miss the rest of the year too. He has a cartilage damage on his knee. It is hwaling up properly, it seems, but you never know with these kind of injuries. I would not go for Zakaria now, even though I think he is better than Rice.

So, Chelsea has one option less. Rice or Kamara for me.

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1 hour ago, killer1257 said:

So, Zakaria will probably miss the rest of the year too. He has a cartilage damage on his knee. It is hwaling up properly, it seems, but you never know with these kind of injuries. I would not go for Zakaria now, even though I think he is better than Rice.

So, Chelsea has one option less. Rice or Kamara for me.

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why would he miss the rest of the year?

his knee Injury was Mar 8, 2020, surely he will not be out 15 straight months with it

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why would he miss the rest of the year?
his knee Injury was Mar 8, 2020, surely he will not be out 15 straight months with it
There are reports in Germany the last couple of days that his injury is very complex and takes a lot of time to heal properly (and it seems to be healing), and Gladbach expects him to be out for a while longer. The problem was that the extent of his injury came out later than expected. First they said he does not need operation, then he suddenly needs one etc.
Also, he had some setbacks with his injury.
So, according to German reports I read, he will not play football the rest of the year. Maybe, he might make a comeback january next year or something.

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6 minutes ago, killer1257 said:

There are reports in Germany the last couple of days that his injury is very complex and takes a lot of time to heal properly (and it seems to be healing), and Gladbach expects him to be out for a while longer. The problem was that the extent of his injury came out later than expected. First they said he does not need operation, then he suddenly needs one etc.
Also, he had some setbacks with his injury.
So, according to German reports I read, he will not play football the rest of the year. Maybe, he might make a comeback january next year or something.

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well, IF his injury is so bad that he does miss the entire season

then

hard pass

FUCKKKKKKKKKKKK

and with Partey now gone

its Rice or bust for the trad DMF cruncher role

 

all the others I rate are not the true trad DMF type, they are more roamers

Camavinga or if he is Real Madrid or Barca-bound 

then go for the next best things, Boubacar Kamara or Bruno Guimarães or Ismaël Bennacer (a hard pull, I doubt he leaves AC Milan) or finally the last of those 4 for me in terms of my preference, Boubakary Soumaré

Boubacar Kamara and  MAYBE Boubakary Soumaré are the closest to a trad DMF

 

next summer is the last window Marcelo Brozovic as a viable buy (due to his age) BUT he is not a true DMF really, and if we wanted him, we have had multiple chances for years and years )but I would not lose my mind if we bought him, he is a class player, just wish we had grabbed him 5 years ago or so)

Marten de Roon is 30yo in 5 months, so hard pass, and he is hardly WC anyway, and never will be (obviously)

Kalvin Phillips is interesting, but he is overvalued now (English tax), will cost £50m or more, which is too much 

Aurélien Tchouaméni, soon 21yo from Monaco is another interesting player

that's about it atm, in terms of my main list

 

All you need to know about Man Utd, City, Chelsea-linked Denis Zakaria

https://www.planetfootball.com/quick-reads/all-you-need-to-know-about-man-utd-city-chelsea-linked-denis-zakaria/

The latest rising star to follow in the footsteps of Kai Havertz and Timo Werner in trading the Bundesliga for the Premier League could well be Borussia Monchengladbach midfielder Denis Zakaria.

That’s according to the latest talk in the tabloids, with suggestions that Chelsea and Manchester United are keeping close tabs on the 23-year-old Switzerland international, who has previously been linked with Liverpool and Manchester City.

But who is he, what kind of player is he, and how good is he? Here’s everything you need to know about Zakaria.

The story so far

Born and raised in Geneva and developed at local club Servette, Zakaria started to make a name for himself for Switzerland’s Under-19s and was soon scouted by Swiss Super League giants Young Boys, who signed him as an 18-year-old in 2015.

He immediately became an important player for the club, making 67 appearances across two seasons as they finished runners-up in successive years to a dominant Basel side on a run of eight straight titles.

 

snip

 

killer1257 likes this

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On 24/10/2020 at 1:40 PM, Vesper said:

well, IF his injury is so bad that he does miss the entire season

then

hard pass

FUCKKKKKKKKKKKK

and with Partey now gone

its Rice or bust for the trad DMF cruncher role

 

all the others I rate are not the true trad DMF type, they are more roamers

Camavinga or if he is Real Madrid or Barca-bound 

then go for the next best things, Boubacar Kamara or Bruno Guimarães or Ismaël Bennacer (a hard pull, I doubt he leaves AC Milan) or finally the last of those 4 for me in terms of my preference, Boubakary Soumaré

Boubacar Kamara and  MAYBE Boubakary Soumaré are the closest to a trad DMF

 

next summer is the last window Marcelo Brozovic as a viable buy (due to his age) BUT he is not a true DMF really, and if we wanted him, we have had multiple chances for years and years )but I would not lose my mind if we bought him, he is a class player, just wish we had grabbed him 5 years ago or so)

Marten de Roon is 30yo in 5 months, so hard pass, and he is hardly WC anyway, and never will be (obviously)

Kalvin Phillips is interesting, but he is overvalued now (English tax), will cost £50m or more, which is too much 

Aurélien Tchouaméni, soon 21yo from Monaco is another interesting player

that's about it atm, in terms of my main list

 

All you need to know about Man Utd, City, Chelsea-linked Denis Zakaria

https://www.planetfootball.com/quick-reads/all-you-need-to-know-about-man-utd-city-chelsea-linked-denis-zakaria/

The latest rising star to follow in the footsteps of Kai Havertz and Timo Werner in trading the Bundesliga for the Premier League could well be Borussia Monchengladbach midfielder Denis Zakaria.

That’s according to the latest talk in the tabloids, with suggestions that Chelsea and Manchester United are keeping close tabs on the 23-year-old Switzerland international, who has previously been linked with Liverpool and Manchester City.

But who is he, what kind of player is he, and how good is he? Here’s everything you need to know about Zakaria.

The story so far

Born and raised in Geneva and developed at local club Servette, Zakaria started to make a name for himself for Switzerland’s Under-19s and was soon scouted by Swiss Super League giants Young Boys, who signed him as an 18-year-old in 2015.

He immediately became an important player for the club, making 67 appearances across two seasons as they finished runners-up in successive years to a dominant Basel side on a run of eight straight titles.

 

snip

 

Alternatively, Amapdu may be able to slot in. He was very impressive against the Dippers. In my opinion, if Amapdu can stay fit and concentrate his game on becoming a DM (which I think is his best position anyway) then I think he becomes a usable option in the next 12-24 months. Tbh, with the options we have to play the pivot I was slightly surprised he wasn't kept as he is probably better suited to playing alongside Kante/Jorgi/Kova than any of those as a pair. I suspect, we it may have been because we couldn't shift any of them we loaned Amapdu as he is in desperate need of minutes. 

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Good perofrmance from ginter today vs leipzig. Ialwys find it amazing how gladbach have no-name non-international german and austrian players like hoffmann or wolf to play at such a levle they can compete with superexpensive squads. i guess we just have alot of talent in the ocuntry

OhForAGreavsie likes this

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We go again.

No doubt we will use one more year option for Silva, Zouma is great so two of Chris, Rudi and Tomori (loan) would have to leave.

 

Fernando likes this

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6 hours ago, NikkiCFC said:

We go again.

No doubt we will use one more year option for Silva, Zouma is great so two of Chris, Rudi and Tomori (loan) would have to leave.

 

Gladbach seem to still rate AC to a certain extent. I reckon there could be a chance of a AC+ cash deal. 

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Summary:

Chelsea will try again in January for Rice

West Ham are offering him a new contract with higher wages to try and get him to stay

2 permanent deals had been arranged for players in the final days of the last window to facilitate a move for Rice but both fell through

Lampard sees him as first choice as a DM and a depth option at CB

Club believe Rice can be convinced if a fee is agreed, hence trying in January

He would be eligible for the Champions League

Kante is seen as more of the attacking member in a pivot or the right hand midfielder of a three

Fernando likes this

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1 hour ago, Blues Forever said:

Kante is seen as more of the attacking member in a pivot or the right hand midfielder of a three

giphy.gif

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