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Jason

11. Timo Werner

Started by Jason,

580 posts in this topic

If I was Werner I'd be fucking pissed I signed just to play with Shitginho, Mason and Kepa.

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We can be thankful he is not made of glass like Pulisic but is built more like Hazard. As it seems at the moment.

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Think about being a defender seeing he and Pulisic sprinting at them...

Hes going to be a beast. I wish he'd be our designated penalty taker as well. For me you always want your main striker to take pens. Let him see the ball hit the back of the net. 

kellzfresh and 11Drogba like this

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53 minutes ago, Jason said:

The lack of intelligence or bravery of our midfielders or even defenders today to not play the ball over the top for Werner to run into is maddening. Even if they don't succeed, at least that intent might have scared Liverpool off and forced them to drop deeper and thus maybe would have allowed us more room to play with from the back. Fabregas would have had a field day playing with someone like Werner upfront. If only we could go back in time and put Fabregas in this team!

It’s true. Werner makes tons of runs and all our midfielders pick the safe option. Ziyech can’t come in soon enough. And once we replace Kante we must make sure the new guy can play nice long passes from deep.

kellzfresh likes this

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Werner on why he rejected and the future at Chelsea...

https://www.goal.com/en/news/my-goal-is-to-get-to-the-level-of-mane-salah-firmino-chelsea-new-/mqkvzmzyk62m1deu0nf33el5j

Asked why he turned down the chance to join the Reds, the 24-year-old told Bild: "I think it says enough that Jurgen Klopp is currently one of the most successful coaches in the world. Of course, if he wants you for his team, you will start pondering.

"In the past few months, I have also thought about a few other interested clubs. In the end, I decided to go to Chelsea with full conviction because I think it's the best move for me. I can say I haven't regretted it so far and I certainly won't in the future."

Werner added: "I had to make the best decision for myself. At Chelsea, I saw that I can play straight away and be a regular. With this project, I can grow.

"This is an opportunity that Sadio Mane or Mohamed Salah may have seen four or three years ago at Liverpool FC. They too went there to develop so that they could win the Premier League and the Champions League. That's where I was now, and of course, I would like to see that development."

The Chelsea forward went on to confess that he was put off a move to Liverpool due to the presence of Mane, Salah and Firmino, who have helped fire the club towards Champions League and Premier League success in recent years, with it his desire to continue taking in regular minutes in order to reach similar heights in the future.

"It would be a lie to say with regard to such top players that it would have been easy to get past them directly," said Werner. "It's not like I got there and could have said: 'Hello, I'm Timo, and from now on I always play here!'

"I would have had to prove myself over a longer period of time, in which I initially might have been behind at first. My goal is to get to the level of such players. And I see an opportunity at Chelsea. I'm 24 years old, so I have to play.

"At Leipzig, I was also a bit spoiled in this regard, as I never had to miss a game when I was physically able to play. You get a taste that you don't want to miss anymore."

The ex-Leipzig star made his debut for Chelsea in a 3-1 victory at Brighton last weekend, and will likely retain a place in Lampard's line up when they take on defending Premier League champions Liverpool at the Bridge on Sunday.

Werner is not expecting the Blues to launch a title challenge this season, but has full confidence in the long-term project currently being undertaken in west London.

"We have to be honest with ourselves and say that we probably won't win the Premier League or the Champions League this season. If it works anyway, all the nicer. But that's not what the club expects," he said.

"As I said, I like to compare that to Liverpool a few years ago. In the first year, the team didn't win a title either. In the second year they were in the Champions League final, in the third they won it and in the fourth, the title in the Premier League followed.

"With our Chelsea project, too, we want to develop step by step so that we have greater chances for the title after each season."

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On 19/09/2020 at 11:51 AM, Jason said:

Wonder who his favorite F1 driver is. :ph34r:

Timo Werner
Date of birth    6 March 1996 (age 24)
Place of birth    Stuttgart, Germany

 

Christian Werner (May 19, 1892 in Stuttgart – June 17, 1932 in Stuttgart-Cannstatt) 

90 years ago: Mercedes triumphs in 1924 Targa Florio and Coppa Florio

https://media.daimler.com/marsMediaSite/en/instance/ko/90-years-ago-Mercedes-triumphs-in-1924-Targa-Florio-and-Coppa-Florio.xhtml?oid=9919677

90 years ago: Mercedes triumphs in 1924 Targa Florio and Coppa FlorioD89394

Christian Werner wins both races and sets the fastest lap time
“Best factory team”: new Mercedes 2-litre racing cars impress
Innovative engineering: supercharged four-cylinder engine

 

A mountainous course along narrow roads with over 7,000 bends before the gates of Palermo in Sicily, Italy: welcome to the Targa Florio. This was a highly popular and demanding road race especially in the first half of the last century. In 1924, one lap was 108 kilometres in length. The Targa Florio was run over four laps, while the Coppa Florio required the competitors to complete an extra tour of the circuit, i.e. a total of 540 kilometres. In a supercharged Mercedes Christian Werner won the Targa Florio on 27 April 1924 in a time of 6:32:37 hours, triumphed in the Coppa Florio in a time of 8:17:1.4 hours and also drove the fastest lap in 1:35 hours. Positions 2 and 3 in the same racing class were likewise occupied by Mercedes with drivers Christian Lautenschlager and Alfred Neubauer. This meant nothing less than a triple victory for Daimler-Motoren-Gesellschaft (DMG) – a magical moment in the “120 Years of Motorsport” anniversary being celebrated by Mercedes-Benz Classic in 2014.
Mercedes was the only make of car with all vehicles completing the course. The winner of the Targa was by no means assured of victory in the Coppa, because the chances of falling foul of the road and terrain conditions on the final lap were enormous. Of the 37 starters, only 21 made it to the finishing line in the Targa Florio. And as few as 16 saw the chequered flag one lap later in the Coppa Florio. So Christian Werner certainly earned tremendous respect for his overall performance – but so too did his team colleagues, because all of them proved equal to the challenges of what was at the time probably Europe’s toughest road race.
The team sent a telegram to Stuttgart to announce the overall result: “Overall result Werner wins Targa and Coppa Florio, also Coppa Caltavuturo for shortest time from start to that place, also Coppa Villa Igiea for lap record, also Grand Gold Medal of King of Italy, ditto Motor Club of Sicily, also all prizes awarded by Palermo Merchants’ Chamber stop class result Werner first, Lautenschlager second, Neubauer third, Mercedes team wins Coppa Termini for best factory team.”
The new Mercedes two-litre racing cars had been painted red for the Targa instead of the usual German racing colour, which was white. That was all part of the calculation: as most spectators were Italian, enthusiastically cheering on the local, red-painted vehicles, but sometimes obstructing the path of differently coloured foreign cars, Mercedes decided to compete in red cars – and the result was a triple victory.
 
Mercedes racing cars for Sicily
 
Victory was decided by turning up with the right hardware. After the race, the Paris-based magazine “Auto” wrote the following about the Stuttgart car maker and its Targa vehicles: “The Mercedes cars were built as they needed to be for the race course in Sicily: short wheelbase, correctly positioned centre of gravity, special attention to comfortable seats for the drivers (such as a cushion of coarse-grained leather to prevent sliding). The Mercedes vehicles also boasted two precious qualities that even non-experts are likely to have appreciated: a quite wonderful road-holding ability and a steering mechanism that puts little load on the front axle and is therefore very soft and extremely precise.”
The Mercedes racing cars were further developments of the first supercharged Mercedes racing car, which was entered in the 1922 Targa Florio, then powered by a 1.5-litre four-cylinder engine with a supercharger arranged vertically on the front end of the engine. This engine already had two overhead camshafts driven by a vertical shaft as well as four-valve technology with the spark plug positioned for the first time in the centre of the cylinder.
This engine spawned the 2-litre racing engine for the 2-litre formula, which was introduced in 1922. It featured the innovative cross-flow principle: intake on the left, exhaust on the right. The racing engines used in the 1924 Targa had a power output of 50 kW (67.5 hp) without supercharger and 93 kW (126 hp) with supercharger at 4,500 rpm. The engine could be revved for short periods to 4,800 rpm. Towards the end of 1924, the last version of this high-performance engine delivered as much as 110 kW (150 hp).
The chassis and body on the Targa Florio racing cars were broadly identical to those on the racers entered in the 1923 “Indianapolis 500”, with the differences being that the track was slightly wider and the frame was modified at the rear end to accommodate the indispensable spare wheels. The most important innovation for the drivers was a small windscreen in front of the steering wheel, which was designed to protect them against the hail of small stones that were thrown into the air when overtaking a competitor.
After the Targa Florio, the vehicle saw further successful action in numerous other races. In the Klausen Run of August 1924, Otto Merz drove the best time of the day in the red racer. For the Semmering Race in September, Otto Salzer even had a 4.5-litre engine from the 1914 Grand Prix car installed in a Targa Florio chassis, additionally fitting it with a supercharger. Although Salzer set the fastest time for racing cars in the over three litres class driving this monster, which he lovingly called the “Grandmother”, overall victory went to the Targa Florio winner Wilhelm Werner in “his” red 2-litre racer. Two years later, in September 1926, none other than Rudolf Caracciola, in the “ Grandmother”, managed to win the Semmering Race in a new record time.
 
Christian Werner and his racing colleagues
 
Christian Werner, born in 1892, began his professional career at Daimler-Motoren-Gesellschaft in December 1911 as a “mechanic and chauffeur”, served as a driver in the First World War and joined DMG’s dynamic final inspection department as a “master driver” at the end of 1918.
His first great race was the 1922 Targa Florio, in which he finished second in the over 4.5-litre class. In the same year, he was overall winner of the “Tour of Romania”, the outstanding elements of which were a speed trial, a measured drive for lowest petrol and oil consumption and a hill-climb race with four people on board. In 1923, Werner finished eleventh in the overall classification at Indianapolis, where he came second among drivers of German cars and third among European car makes. His greatest triumph, however, was his victory in the 1924 Targa Florio and Coppa Florio.
His racing colleagues Christian Lautenschlager and Alfred Neubauer were also well-known names in the early years of motor racing. Lautenschlager was the famous winner of the French Grand Prix of 1908 (Dieppe) and 1914 (Lyon). The 1914 race likewise went down in history as a glorious triple victory for Mercedes. At that time, Neubauer, too, was a successful racing driver, although he later made his mark above all as Mercedes-Benz racing director, a position he held until 1955.
 
D89722D893951280px-Christian_Werner_in_his_Mercedes_at_the_1922_Targa_Florio.jpgD209695

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:doh: 
CAN WE GET FABREGAS BACK INTO THE TEAM!?
It is not like last season was any better. Tammy and Giroud made many runs last season, but when Mount and Jorgi cannot make those fabrepasses, making runs is pointless. Only Kovacic can play good passes, but because he has many more responsibilities, he can't do it all. Next summer, we should go for Aouar if he still is available

Gesendet von meinem VOG-L29 mit Tapatalk

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3 hours ago, killer1257 said:

It is not like last season was any better. Tammy and Giroud made many runs last season, but when Mount and Jorgi cannot make those fabrepasses, making runs is pointless. Only Kovacic can play good passes, but because he has many more responsibilities, he can't do it all. Next summer, we should go for Aouar if he still is available

Gesendet von meinem VOG-L29 mit Tapatalk
 

Long balls for Giroud to chase? :lol: 

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Werner admits to having doubts over Chelsea transfer after watching Champions League defeat to Bayern

https://www.goal.com/en/news/werner-admits-to-having-doubts-over-chelsea-transfer-after/hp50h71c5fx5zdbkpwic35nl

Werner has conceded that the final result in west London made him question the merits of a potential switch to west London, telling Sport Bild journalist Christian Falk: “I would be lying if I said it wasn't like that. 

"The 3-0 home defeat of Chelsea in the first leg against Bayern hadn't exactly spoken in favour of going to London.

"I have to say that openly, because with Leipzig we always played very good and close games against Bayern." 

The 24-year-old was, however, impressed with the way the Blues bounced back to finish the campaign strongly, which led to him changing his mind about joining the club before their 4-1 second-leg loss at Allianz Arena.

He added: "By showing Chelsea the weak points, the club was able to work on the pieces of the puzzle in order to catch up with the future Champions League winners Bayern. That's what Chelsea did."

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2 hours ago, Jason said:

Werner admits to having doubts over Chelsea transfer after watching Champions League defeat to Bayern

https://www.goal.com/en/news/werner-admits-to-having-doubts-over-chelsea-transfer-after/hp50h71c5fx5zdbkpwic35nl

 

 

Love that he has the honesty to say what all of us know he must have been thinking. He'd have to be an idiot not to have been jolted by how easily Bayern brushed us aside. Taken together with his hugely impressive 'press conference', I think this confirms that we've signed a young man of the highest calibre. His talent, plus his intelligence, plus his character makes this an outstanding capture. I can't tell you how glad I am that Liverpool did not try harder to get Timo.

Stats, DDA and Fernando like this

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