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Vesper

Coronaviral

Started by Vesper,

690 posts in this topic
2 hours ago, Vesper said:

Many hospitalized in the U.S. are younger adults.

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/03/19/world/coronavirus-news.html#link-6b7aa982

A drive-through testing center for Covid-19 in West Palm Beach, Fla., this week.

American adults of all ages — not just those in their 70s, 80s and 90s — are being seriously sickened by the coronavirus, according to a report on nearly 2,500 cases in the United States.

The report, issued Wednesday by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, found that — as in other countries — the oldest patients were at greatest risk of becoming seriously ill or dying. But of the 508 coronavirus patients known to have been hospitalized in the United States, 38 percent were between 20 and 54. And nearly half of the 121 sickest patients studied — those admitted to intensive care units — were adults under 65.

“I think everyone should be paying attention to this,” said Stephen S. Morse, a professor of epidemiology at Columbia University. “It’s not just going to be the elderly.”

Dr. Deborah Birx, coordinator of the Trump administration’s coronavirus task force, appealed on Wednesday for younger people to stop socializing in groups and to take care to protect themselves and others.

“You have the potential then to spread it to someone who does have a condition that none of us knew about, and cause them to have a disastrous outcome,” Dr. Birx said.

In the C.D.C. report, 20 percent of the hospitalized patients and 12 percent of the intensive care patients were between the ages of 20 and 44, basically spanning the millennial generation.

 

 

 

 

STRIKING THE YOUNG

Younger Adults Make Up Big Portion of Coronavirus Hospitalizations in U.S.

New C.D.C. data shows that nearly 40 percent of patients sick enough to be hospitalized were age 20 to 54. But the risk of dying was significantly higher in older people.

 
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American adults of all ages — not just those in their 70s, 80s and 90s — are being seriously sickened by the coronavirus, according to a report on nearly 2,500 of the first recorded cases in the United States.

The report, issued Wednesday by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, found that — as in other countries — the oldest patients had the greatest likelihood of dying and of being hospitalized. But of the 508 patients known to have been hospitalized, 38 percent were notably younger — between 20 and 54. And nearly half of the 121 patients who were admitted to intensive care units were adults under 65, the C.D.C. reported.

“I think everyone should be paying attention to this,” said Stephen S. Morse, a professor of epidemiology at Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health. “It’s not just going to be the elderly. There will be people age 20 and up. They do have to be careful, even if they think that they’re young and healthy.”

The findings served to underscore an appeal issued Wednesday at a White House briefing by Dr. Deborah Birx, a physician and State Department official who is a leader of the administration’s coronavirus task force. Citing similar reports of young adults in Italy and in France being hospitalized and needing intensive care, Dr. Birx implored the millennial generation to stop socializing in groups and to take care to protect themselves and others.

“You have the potential then to spread it to someone who does have a condition that none of us knew about, and cause them to have a disastrous outcome,” Dr. Birx said, addressing young people.

In the C.D.C. report, 20 percent of the hospitalized patients and 12 percent of the intensive care patients were between the ages of 20 and 44, basically spanning the millennial generation.

“Younger people may feel more confident about their ability to withstand a virus like this,” said Dr. Christopher Carlsten, head of respiratory medicine at the University of British Columbia. But, he said, “if that many younger people are being hospitalized, that means that there are a lot of young people in the community that are walking around with the infection.”

The new data represents a preliminary look at the first significant wave of cases in the United States that does not include people who returned to the country from Wuhan, China, or from Japan, the authors reported. Between Feb. 12 and March 16, there were 4,226 such cases reported to the C.D.C., the study says.

The ages were reported for 2,449 of those patients, the C.D.C. said, and of those, 6 percent were 85 and older, and 25 percent were between 65 and 84. Twenty-nine percent were aged 20 to 44.

The age groups of 55 to 64 and 45 to 54 each included 18 percent of the total. Only 5 percent of cases were diagnosed in people 19 and younger.

The report included no information about whether patients of any age had underlying risk factors, such as a chronic illness or a compromised immune system. So, it is impossible to determine whether the younger patients who were hospitalized were more susceptible to serious infection than most others in their age group.

But experts said that even if younger people in the report were medical outliers, the fact that they were taking up hospital beds and space in intensive care units was significant.

And these more serious cases represent the leading edge of how the pandemic is rapidly unfolding in the United States, showing that adults of all ages are susceptible and should be concerned about protecting their own health, and not transmitting the virus to others.

The youngest age group, people 19 and under, accounted for less than 1 percent of the hospitalizations, and none of the I.C.U. admissions or deaths. This dovetails with data from other countries so far. This week, however, the largest study to date of pediatric cases in China found that a small segment of very young children may need hospitalization for very serious symptoms, and that one 14-year-old boy in China died from the virus.

Of the 44 people whose deaths were recorded in the report, 15 were age 85 or older and 20 were between the ages of 65 to 84. There were nine deaths among adults age 20 to 64, the report said.

Some of the patients in the study are still sick, the authors noted, so the results of their cases are unclear. Data was missing for a number of the cases, “which likely resulted in an underestimation of the outcomes,” the authors wrote. Because of the missing data, the authors presented percentages of hospitalizations, I.C.U. admissions and deaths as a range. The report also says that the limited testing available in the United States so far makes this report only an early snapshot of the crisis.

Still, the authors wrote, “these preliminary data also demonstrate that severe illness leading to hospitalization, including I.C.U. admission and death, can occur in adults of any age with Covid-19.”

Many are not taking care of themselves. 

There's those young people in Florida wanting to party because of spring break.....

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2 hours ago, Vesper said:

Why is it so bad in Italy?

What makes it hit so hard there then in other countries?

Is it that they have a lot of old people? Poor immune system? The food they eat? etc etc

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14 minutes ago, Fernando said:

Many are not taking care of themselves. 

There's those young people in Florida wanting to party because of spring break.....

SAD :(

Vesper and 11Drogba like this

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15 minutes ago, Fernando said:

Why is it so bad in Italy?

What makes it hit so hard there then in other countries?

Is it that they have a lot of old people? Poor immune system? The food they eat? etc etc

65 years and over: 21.69% (male 5,817,819 /female 7,683,330) (2018 est.)

Life Expectancy by Country in 2020

TOP 5:

1. HONG KONG 84.7

2. JAPAN 84.5

3. SWITZERLAND 83.6

4. SINGAPORE 83.7

5. ITALY 83.4

Yes they are very old country but one of the healthiest in the world. HK and Singapore are basically cities and Switzerland is also very small country so with Japan they are the most healthiest nation in the world.

11Drogba, Vesper and Fernando like this

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15 hours ago, Fernando said:

Why is it so bad in Italy?

What makes it hit so hard there then in other countries?

Is it that they have a lot of old people? Poor immune system? The food they eat? etc etc

they had a shedload of infected people slam into wide circulation, more than any other EU country, plus their lifestyle is based off being super social

Fernando and 11Drogba like this

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Wall Street is pressuring key healthcare firms to hike prices over the coronavirus crisis. Audio here of bankers asking drug companies, firms supplying N95 masks & ventilators, to figure out how to profit from the Covid-19 emergency.

https://theintercept.com/2020/03/19/coronavirus-vaccine-medical-supplies-price-gouging/

 

:rant:

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14 hours ago, NikkiCFC said:

SAD :(

and now

COVID-19 is killing under 40 years olds at a much higher rate than was thought, especially in the USA and some other places

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9 minutes ago, Vesper said:

Wall Street is pressuring key healthcare firms to hike prices over the coronavirus crisis. Audio here of bankers asking drug companies, firms supplying N95 masks & ventilators, to figure out how to profit from the Covid-19 emergency.

https://theintercept.com/2020/03/19/coronavirus-vaccine-medical-supplies-price-gouging/

 

:rant:

''Drug companies eschew vaccine development because of the limited profit potential for a one-time treatment''

Hopefully those bankers and CEOs squeezing extra profit out of death will get infected

Vesper likes this

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UK: Restriction should continue 'most of a year'

Policies to limit the spread of coronavirus would need to be in place for "at least most of a year" to prevent intensive care units being overwhelmed, according to official scientific advice to the government.

The documents, prepared by the UK's Scientific Advisory Group for Emergencies (Sage), said alternating between more and less strict measures could "plausibly be effective at keeping the number of critical care cases within capacity".

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/live/world-51969508

 

 

This appears to have been published 4 days ago:

https://www.gov.uk/government/groups/scientific-advisory-group-for-emergencies-sage-coronavirus-covid-19-response
SPI-M-O: Consensus view on behavioural and social interventions (16 March 2020)
 

It was agreed that a combination of case isolation, household isolation and social
distancing of vulnerable groups is very unlikely to prevent critical care facilities being
overwhelmed.
2. It was agreed that it is unclear whether or not the addition of general social distancing
measures to case isolation, household isolation and social distancing of vulnerable groups
would curtail the epidemic by reducing the reproduction number to less than 1.
3. It was agreed that the addition of both general social distancing and school closures to
case isolation, household isolation and social distancing of vulnerable groups would be
likely to control the epidemic when kept in place for a long period. SPI-M-O agreed that
this strategy should be followed as soon as practical, at least in the first instance.
4. It was agreed that a policy of alternating between periods of more and less strict social
distancing measures could plausibly be effective at keeping the number of critical care
cases within capacity. These would need to be in place for at least most of a year. Under
such as policy, at least half of the year would be spent under the stricter social distancing
measures.
5. The triggers for measures to be enacted and lifted could be set at a level of UK nations
and regions. The duration of control periods would be less important than the extent to
which contacts are reduced. There would be a 2-3 week delay between measures being
put into place and their impact being felt in ICU.

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That keyworker list is so broad! Be interesting to see how many children we end up with at nursery..not that I'll know for a week..I think.. beautiful cough! Hopefully it is just that!

The whole thing is madness! A month ago it was mehhhh what's happening in China. Now its bam bam its everywhere!

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28 minutes ago, Laylabelle said:

That keyworker list is so broad! Be interesting to see how many children we end up with at nursery..not that I'll know for a week..I think.. beautiful cough! Hopefully it is just that!

The whole thing is madness! A month ago it was mehhhh what's happening in China. Now its bam bam its everywhere!

great book to read

Illness as Metaphor by Susan Sontag

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Illness_as_Metaphor

c7fada6abaefaec7717544c9f36575e2.png

Illness as Metaphor is a 1978 work of critical theory by Susan Sontag, in which she challenges the victim-blaming in the language often used to describe diseases and those who suffer from them.

Teasing out the similarities between public perspectives on cancer (the paradigmatic disease of the 20th century before the appearance of AIDS), and tuberculosis (the symbolic illness of the 19th century), Sontag shows that both diseases were associated with personal psychological traits. In particular, she says that the metaphors and terms used to describe both syndromes lead to an association between repressed passion and the physical disease itself. She notes the peculiar reversal that "With the modern diseases (once TB, now cancer), the romantic idea that the disease expresses the character is invariably extended to assert that the character causes the disease–because it has not expressed itself. Passion moves inward, striking and blighting the deepest cellular recesses."

Sontag says that the clearest and most truthful way of thinking about diseases is without recourse to metaphor. She believed that wrapping disease in metaphors discouraged, silenced, and shamed patients. Other writers have disagreed with her, saying that metaphors and other symbolic language help affected people form meaning out of their experiences.[1]

snip

 

great online bookstore

https://www.bookdepository.com/Illness-Metaphor-Susan-Sontag/9780312420130?ref=grid-view&qid=1584716849076&sr=1-1

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100% workforce shutdown in New York State just announced live by the Governor (Andrew Cuomo)

only essential workers are allow to travel to their jobs

the virus is exploding exponentially in NYC, doubling every 3 or so days

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India doing a lockdown test run of sorts on Sunday calling it a public curfew. More and more places deciding to lock down. 

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I don’t think people have fully digested this shocking fact:

Coronavirus was discovered in the U.S. on the SAME DAY it was discovered in South Korea.

They mobilized their entire society and it is now contained.

Trump called it a hoax and it’s now out of control.

 

 

manpe likes this

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