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Blue-in-me-Veins

Danny Drinkwater

Started by Blue-in-me-Veins,

463 posts in this topic

Lets put this Drinkwater maths shite to bed once and for all

Transfer fee £35m

Salary £110K per week (there was some confusion as some sites said £120K per week but I am going with 110K now per the extremely reputable Athletic

https://theathletic.com/1516614/2020/01/07/danny-drinkwater-aston-villa-wages/

so

5 years at 110K per week is £28.6m in wages

meaning we are on the hook for a total of £63.6m for the 5 years  

we paid all his wages in

2017-18 we paid ALL his wages

2018-19 we paid ALL his wages

2019-20

Burnley paid £1m for a 5 month loan (they picked up 50K of the 110K in wages for 20 weeks, again per multiple links including the Athletic one above)

we demanded they pay it all for the rest of the year, they said piss off

Aston Villa the same (we wanted them to pay the full 110K they said no), so we cut a deal (probably similar to Burnleys, BUT I will even give us the benefit of the doubt, an say they are paying 50% more than Burnley, so 1.5m quid for the 5 months)

Lets say we somehow get a team to pay his FULL wages on a 2 year loan (2020-22) to close it out (there is almost no chance of get a transfer fee for him with these wages and his age)

again I am giving us full benefit of the doubt here

so that knocks off (assuming they pay the full 24 remaining months of his wages) £11.44m (and that is also generous as a team can wait a couple of months to start the 2 year loan, so they would only pay 22 months worth or so)

lets do the maths

£63.6m

minus

1m

minus 1.5m

minus 11.44m

equals

a straight cumulative net spend of £49.66m (call it £50m, especially if we only get 23 or 22 months for the final 2 year loan) (as he walks on a free in June 2022)

that £50m also assumes we can do what we have failed to do so far, that being getting a team to pay his FULL salary for 2 years (which is really looking shaky atm)

so that £50m could easily go up to around £53m to 55m in total net cost

no team is going to buy him for even £10m in transfer fees and then pick up those insane wages on top. At just a £10m transfer fee, that would mean they are paying around £21.5m for a 30 to 32 year old MFer (who was been a disaster for the past 3 years) for just two years of play, and a player who then walks on a free (or they keep him and pay him far lower). Why would a team shit away 10m (at a minimum) when they can just loan him and probably NOT even have to pay his full wages (no one except us has paid his full wages yet)

If anyone thinks that that is 'good business' by the board, and that I am an idiot who doesn't know finance (laughable) then I truly do not know what to say, other than good luck in life.

So sick of these dodgy as hell appeal to authority logical fallacies being rammed down our throats by a few bad apples. Remember, this is the same board who just shit away £26m plus on the sacking of just one manager. I do not (nor have I EVER claimed to) have access to the club's books, but their public disclosures back me up 100%. You can take what I say with a grain of salt (I urge any and all to always fact check me, and I always try to provide links), but I will be fucked if I am gaslit into believing we are conducting an overall good business model when it comes to contractual management, piss poor buys, cocked-up non buys and stalled out (to the point the window closes) tie ups on multiple occasion (Italy, I am looking at you), non-timely sales (knowing a player will not renew), renewals of contracts for dodgy players and overall salary cock-ups in general.

NO ONE on here needs an advanced degree in any sort of actuarial or fiduciary science to see it has been one disaster after another. But by all means, put those baby blue blinders on and all hail the magnificence that is the Chels board!

#sodone

 

 

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Eric Bailly: Manchester United trigger two-year extension in defender's contract

 
I have a question about this? How come United does this and we don't do this? 
It helps so that no one can leave on a free. 
Atomiswave likes this

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56 minutes ago, Fernando said:

Eric Bailly: Manchester United trigger two-year extension in defender's contract

 
I have a question about this? How come United does this and we don't do this? 
It helps so that no one can leave on a free. 

Because... board.

:ph34r:

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0c6309740132368d3e8f9c39f9f2ce94.png

The Ballad of Danny Drinkwater

The fall of a Premier League champion shows just how precarious a soccer career can be, and the damage that can be inflicted by one bad choice.

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/01/17/sports/danny-drinkwater-lionel-messi.html

Enjoying this newsletter every week? Forward it to a friend and tell them to sign up at nytimes.com/rory.

A few hours after Danny Drinkwater joined Aston Villa in the first week of January, a friend asked if he wanted to go watch his new club in action.

Aston Villa was playing at Leicester City in the semifinals of the Carabao Cup, English soccer’s midweek afterthought, the night after Drinkwater’s move was confirmed. There was a space for him in an executive box at the King Power Stadium: Drinkwater could come along, pretty much incognito, and cast an eye over the Villa players who were, now, his teammates.

Politely, he declined the invitation. It is not especially hard to discern why. Leicester was, of course, where Drinkwater spent the happiest, most productive years of his career: a central cog in the team that first won promotion to the Premier League in 2014 and then, as is still occasionally pointed out whenever Leicester is mentioned, won the English title two years later.

It was at Leicester where Drinkwater grew into one of the most highly regarded midfielders in England. He won the Premier League. He made it to the quarterfinals of the Champions League. He played for England. He was good enough that Chelsea, the team that had succeeded Leicester as champion, paid $45 million to acquire him in 2017.

A few days after that deal went through, Chelsea, in one of those quirks that soccer throws up so frequently that you wonder if the whole thing is scripted, visited Leicester. Ngolo Kanté, a player who had left Leicester for Chelsea a year earlier, was given a rousing reception by his former fans. Drinkwater, named as a substitute, a little less so. The BBC described his welcome as “mixed.” It is a fairly transparent euphemism.

Perhaps that memory gave Drinkwater pause as he contemplated the idea of walking into the King Power, a few months short of three years on, to watch a game. Or, perhaps, it is something a little deeper. Perhaps he sensed that returning to Leicester, where his career topped out, would simply serve to remind him that he had fallen.

 

snip

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2 hours ago, Fernando said:

Eric Bailly: Manchester United trigger two-year extension in defender's contract

 
I have a question about this? How come United does this and we don't do this? 
It helps so that no one can leave on a free. 

Think both parties would have to agree to putting an extension option in the contract? Or if the club activate the option, the player would have to agree as well? Otherwise, the player would just be "surrendering" himself to the club if they have no say whatsoever.

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3 hours ago, Fernando said:

Eric Bailly: Manchester United trigger two-year extension in defender's contract

 
I have a question about this? How come United does this and we don't do this? 
It helps so that no one can leave on a free. 

We've recently done similar with this Nathan guy and people lost their shit.

Seems like we can't win either way.

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5 minutes ago, Special Juan said:

Just sack the bloke what a complete waste of air he is.

Fucking board. He will end up being a £60m plus loss.

Cunts

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Something is seriously wrong with this dude. Earning money he don't deserves hit him in the head. 

Just release him. It's embarrassing to have him in the team. 

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Just hope he don't end up back here, no fucker wants him, and understandably... he's a fucking disaster:middlefinger:

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After all of the stupid things he has done at the pub and now with a teammate, why can't his contract be voided for his conduct?

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14 hours ago, Fulham Broadway said:

He should live up to his name and just drink water

This was at the training ground, so booze can't be the excuse surely, mind you he could start a piss up at the local AA meeting.

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Time is running out for Danny Drinkwater

https://theathletic.com/1680716/2020/03/18/drinkwater-danny-villa-leicester-chelsea-burnley-headbutt/

drinkwater.jpg

The tone of disbelief in the voice on the other end of the telephone is unmistakeable. “This just doesn’t tally with him. It’s like you’re describing someone else.”

One of Danny Drinkwater’s close friends at Chelsea has just been told by The Athletic about the midfielder headbutting Spaniard Jota during an Aston Villa training session, and is in a state of shock.

There have been many negative things said and written about Drinkwater since 2017 but the latest incident, which took place earlier this month, is a new nadir.

The England international is believed to have been fined but, before a decision was made to put the season on hold, Villa were considering cancelling his loan from Chelsea prematurely.

Even if the campaign is completed, there is a strong possibility Drinkwater will not play for Villa again. That means he will have started just 10 Premier League games over three years and one has to wonder if his career at the highest level is in doubt.

So how has it come to this? In 2016, Drinkwater was rightly celebrated as a vital cog in the Leicester City team that stunned the world by winning the Premier League. Now he is in danger of becoming more widely-renowned for scandals off the field. In the last 12 months he has also been charged for drink-driving after crashing his car last April and been in a fight outside a nightclub five months later.

It’s easy to form an unfavourable view of Drinkwater’s personality with the kind of headlines he’s been making but, as with many stories, there is more to it than that.

Former Leicester manager Nigel Pearson gave a little bit of insight back in 2014 as he presented Drinkwater with the club’s Player of the Season award, referring to him on stage as a “complex character”.

There was no talk of altercations with team-mates back then. Although, in training he was very intense and self-critical over any mistake he made. For example, if a pass was misplaced, he would berate himself and even punch himself in the face, much to the bemusement of watching team-mates.

Drinkwater had joined Leicester in 2012, but chose to remain living in the Manchester area. It’s where he was born and also where his football developed, having come through the academy ranks at Manchester United.

A desire to be close to family members has been a consistent concern throughout. One source suggests his tendency to withdraw from, or not make himself available for, England squads is because he didn’t want the stress of travelling and being away from home, especially if he wasn’t going to be playing.

Drinkwater earned all three of his caps in 2016, yet was left out of the Roy Hodgson’s Euro 2016 squad that summer and has never appeared under Gareth Southgate.

The real turning point in the 30-year-old’s professional life came at the end of the following campaign, when Chelsea made it clear they wanted to buy him in order to reunite the midfield partnership with fellow title winner N’Golo Kante.

Instead of being an upgrade, you could argue it was the beginning of the downturn. It didn’t help that the west London club overplayed their hand during negotiations.

Drinkwater made it clear he wanted to leave from the get-go, but this didn’t mean Leicester would sell their asset on the cheap. The asking price was firmly set at £35 million and yet bids of £18 million, £25 million and £27 million (plus add-ons) were made and swiftly rejected.

Increasingly, Drinkwater became more disruptive and handed in a transfer request to try to force a move. It is believed his actions upset several members of the club’s hierarchy and he had arguments with director of football Jon Rudkin towards the end. He was warned by others that his behaviour was out of order and could actually scupper his chances of joining Chelsea.

With the 2017-18 campaign already under way, Drinkwater found himself training with the youth team instead of the first team squad. But on deadline day, Chelsea decided to meet Leicester’s valuation at last.

Unlike Kante’s departure to Stamford Bridge a year earlier, the parting was not on good terms. It didn’t help that the situation was resolved too late for Leicester to sign Adrien Silva as his replacement.

As one Leicester source put it, the feeling was that while Kante had moved to Chelsea to further his career, Drinkwater had merely gone there for the higher salary of £120,000-per week. Drinkwater, though, said he moved to win more trophies. Any speculation regarding a return to the King Power Stadium since then has always been given short shrift.

When it came to making a big impact at Chelsea, a lot of damage was already done. Then-manager Antonio Conte was renowned for his tough training regime and demanded very high levels of fitness.

Drinkwater was an unused substitute for his first Chelsea game at, of all places, Leicester. One source has told The Athletic how Conte was warned by a member of the opposition staff after the match that his new signing was not in the best condition to play because of what had gone on over the previous two months.

In response, Conte arranged a special fitness programme and ordered the player to perform intense running drills. Within days he suffered a painful calf injury and his debut was delayed until October 25.

It was an uphill battle from then on to make Conte’s first choice side, although it should be pointed out he did start in some big games that season, including at Liverpool and Manchester City.

Drinkwater was a popular member of the group, noted for a rather cheeky sense of humour, but there was the issue of being on his own in a flat in Chelsea Harbour. It meant being away from the north west and in particular his young son, who lived with a former partner.

If 2017-18 didn’t go as planned, 2018-19 was a complete disaster. Maurizio Sarri replaced Conte as coach and made it clear to Drinkwater he wasn’t part of his plans.

Inquiries came during the transfer window from West Ham United, Crystal Palace and Southampton. Others from unnamed clubs abroad were also made, but the prospect of living further away from his family did not appeal. Overall, teams were scared off by Chelsea’s asking price in excess of the £35 million they paid and/or covering his wages, especially for someone who hadn’t been on the pitch that much.

So he was stuck. When Sarri informed Drinkwater he wouldn’t even be included in the Europa League squad, a message was enforced he wouldn’t be playing at all.

And so it proved. After playing for 30 minutes as a substitute against Manchester City in the Community Shield, Drinkwater didn’t make another appearance.

Even in training, he was largely ignored. A friend at Chelsea revealed: “In the latter part of the week, Sarri would only use the players that were (going to be) playing so Danny would sometimes be standing on his own to the side, left to his own devices.

“There was a small group who were in a similar situation and there was a bond between them. The fitness coach might take them off to do some running. They shared a sense of humour about it.

“You could see Danny still had quality on the ball when he did get a chance earlier in the week. But he coped with it well under the circumstances. He didn’t cause problems.”

Other people did hear him refer to Sarri in unflattering terms as he walked out for a session. When warned he might be overheard by the Italian, the former Manchester United trainee answered he didn’t care because his situation was set in stone anyway.

The drink-driving incident sparked more talk about what Drinkwater was getting up to in his private life. With no football to occupy him, going out had become more of a norm.

However, sources insist this shouldn’t be misconstrued as him having a drinking problem or being unprofessional. “He was a lad in his 20s,” as one friend put it. Another remarked that there were periods where no alcohol was consumed for “weeks”.

There were achievements off the pitch too, the most significant coming last March when he proudly opened his own restaurant in Manchester called Foodwell.

The chance to escape Chelsea two months earlier had been taken away. Cesc Fabregas was also keen to organise a transfer elsewhere and the club made it clear that only one of them would be let go. It was the Spaniard who got his wish, securing a switch to Monaco. But by setting up a new business, it showed Drinkwater was using some of his Chelsea fortune and spare time wisely.

A change of agent finally led to a change of scenery this season. New manager Frank Lampard involved him at the start of pre-season, yet was always going to prioritise promoting youth talent such as Mason Mount and Billy Gilmour, so a move elsewhere was inevitable.

Burnley made a bid to take him on an initial six-month loan with the view of extending it in January for the remainder of the season. The fact Chelsea agreed to pay £70,000-a-week of Drinkwater’s wages though showed just what kind of price had to be paid just for him to find a new team.

It was always going to take time for him to match the physical levels of his new team-mates, but those close to the club suggest that he fitted in well and there were no problems with the Burnley players. A full 90 minutes in the Carabao Cup against Sunderland, albeit in a 3-1 defeat, was promising.

But the nightclub incident, in which he sustained ankle ligament damage as well as bruising to his face, came just a few days later. It was a setback he never recovered from.

Drinkwater, who had been regarded as a positive influence in the dressing room up to then, made a point of speaking to the squad and acknowledged he had made a mistake. That was well received but there was just one more outing for Burnley after that: his first Premier League appearance for 21 months was not one to remember, as Manchester City won 4-1.

Tellingly, Burnley team-mate Erik Pieters spoke positively about Drinkwater afterwards: “It takes time, but that’s normal. He didn’t play for a while, but he’s looking good, he’s feeling well. He’s a great guy, he’s funny. He fits perfectly.”

Sources suggest it was Drinkwater’s decision to cut short his loan at Burnley because he wanted more game time — another sign that he wasn’t just content to just pick up a pay cheque.

That is when Villa came calling. From manager Dean Smith, to assistant and former Chelsea defender John Terry to those in the hierarchy, Drinkwater’s experience was regarded as an asset in their relegation battle.

Only four starts, in which he has been subbed all four times, have followed, though. The first came in a humiliating 6-1 reverse at home to Manchester City and the last was over a month ago.

One can only guess what was in his mind when he squared up to Jota during a six-a-side game, but perhaps all the frustration of what he’s been through over the last three seasons came to the surface.

Who knows what will happen next? There are still two years left on his Chelsea contract, yet there is little chance of forcing his way back into contention there.

But following two disappointing loans this season, both overshadowed by controversy, there won’t be many clubs queuing up to buy or borrow him either.

Drinkwater can still turn things around, but time is beginning to run out.

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5 hours ago, Vesper said:

Time is running out for Danny Drinkwater

https://theathletic.com/1680716/2020/03/18/drinkwater-danny-villa-leicester-chelsea-burnley-headbutt/

drinkwater.jpg

The tone of disbelief in the voice on the other end of the telephone is unmistakeable. “This just doesn’t tally with him. It’s like you’re describing someone else.”

One of Danny Drinkwater’s close friends at Chelsea has just been told by The Athletic about the midfielder headbutting Spaniard Jota during an Aston Villa training session, and is in a state of shock.

There have been many negative things said and written about Drinkwater since 2017 but the latest incident, which took place earlier this month, is a new nadir.

The England international is believed to have been fined but, before a decision was made to put the season on hold, Villa were considering cancelling his loan from Chelsea prematurely.

Even if the campaign is completed, there is a strong possibility Drinkwater will not play for Villa again. That means he will have started just 10 Premier League games over three years and one has to wonder if his career at the highest level is in doubt.

So how has it come to this? In 2016, Drinkwater was rightly celebrated as a vital cog in the Leicester City team that stunned the world by winning the Premier League. Now he is in danger of becoming more widely-renowned for scandals off the field. In the last 12 months he has also been charged for drink-driving after crashing his car last April and been in a fight outside a nightclub five months later.

It’s easy to form an unfavourable view of Drinkwater’s personality with the kind of headlines he’s been making but, as with many stories, there is more to it than that.

Former Leicester manager Nigel Pearson gave a little bit of insight back in 2014 as he presented Drinkwater with the club’s Player of the Season award, referring to him on stage as a “complex character”.

There was no talk of altercations with team-mates back then. Although, in training he was very intense and self-critical over any mistake he made. For example, if a pass was misplaced, he would berate himself and even punch himself in the face, much to the bemusement of watching team-mates.

Drinkwater had joined Leicester in 2012, but chose to remain living in the Manchester area. It’s where he was born and also where his football developed, having come through the academy ranks at Manchester United.

A desire to be close to family members has been a consistent concern throughout. One source suggests his tendency to withdraw from, or not make himself available for, England squads is because he didn’t want the stress of travelling and being away from home, especially if he wasn’t going to be playing.

Drinkwater earned all three of his caps in 2016, yet was left out of the Roy Hodgson’s Euro 2016 squad that summer and has never appeared under Gareth Southgate.

The real turning point in the 30-year-old’s professional life came at the end of the following campaign, when Chelsea made it clear they wanted to buy him in order to reunite the midfield partnership with fellow title winner N’Golo Kante.

Instead of being an upgrade, you could argue it was the beginning of the downturn. It didn’t help that the west London club overplayed their hand during negotiations.

Drinkwater made it clear he wanted to leave from the get-go, but this didn’t mean Leicester would sell their asset on the cheap. The asking price was firmly set at £35 million and yet bids of £18 million, £25 million and £27 million (plus add-ons) were made and swiftly rejected.

Increasingly, Drinkwater became more disruptive and handed in a transfer request to try to force a move. It is believed his actions upset several members of the club’s hierarchy and he had arguments with director of football Jon Rudkin towards the end. He was warned by others that his behaviour was out of order and could actually scupper his chances of joining Chelsea.

With the 2017-18 campaign already under way, Drinkwater found himself training with the youth team instead of the first team squad. But on deadline day, Chelsea decided to meet Leicester’s valuation at last.

Unlike Kante’s departure to Stamford Bridge a year earlier, the parting was not on good terms. It didn’t help that the situation was resolved too late for Leicester to sign Adrien Silva as his replacement.

As one Leicester source put it, the feeling was that while Kante had moved to Chelsea to further his career, Drinkwater had merely gone there for the higher salary of £120,000-per week. Drinkwater, though, said he moved to win more trophies. Any speculation regarding a return to the King Power Stadium since then has always been given short shrift.

When it came to making a big impact at Chelsea, a lot of damage was already done. Then-manager Antonio Conte was renowned for his tough training regime and demanded very high levels of fitness.

Drinkwater was an unused substitute for his first Chelsea game at, of all places, Leicester. One source has told The Athletic how Conte was warned by a member of the opposition staff after the match that his new signing was not in the best condition to play because of what had gone on over the previous two months.

In response, Conte arranged a special fitness programme and ordered the player to perform intense running drills. Within days he suffered a painful calf injury and his debut was delayed until October 25.

It was an uphill battle from then on to make Conte’s first choice side, although it should be pointed out he did start in some big games that season, including at Liverpool and Manchester City.

Drinkwater was a popular member of the group, noted for a rather cheeky sense of humour, but there was the issue of being on his own in a flat in Chelsea Harbour. It meant being away from the north west and in particular his young son, who lived with a former partner.

If 2017-18 didn’t go as planned, 2018-19 was a complete disaster. Maurizio Sarri replaced Conte as coach and made it clear to Drinkwater he wasn’t part of his plans.

Inquiries came during the transfer window from West Ham United, Crystal Palace and Southampton. Others from unnamed clubs abroad were also made, but the prospect of living further away from his family did not appeal. Overall, teams were scared off by Chelsea’s asking price in excess of the £35 million they paid and/or covering his wages, especially for someone who hadn’t been on the pitch that much.

So he was stuck. When Sarri informed Drinkwater he wouldn’t even be included in the Europa League squad, a message was enforced he wouldn’t be playing at all.

And so it proved. After playing for 30 minutes as a substitute against Manchester City in the Community Shield, Drinkwater didn’t make another appearance.

Even in training, he was largely ignored. A friend at Chelsea revealed: “In the latter part of the week, Sarri would only use the players that were (going to be) playing so Danny would sometimes be standing on his own to the side, left to his own devices.

“There was a small group who were in a similar situation and there was a bond between them. The fitness coach might take them off to do some running. They shared a sense of humour about it.

“You could see Danny still had quality on the ball when he did get a chance earlier in the week. But he coped with it well under the circumstances. He didn’t cause problems.”

Other people did hear him refer to Sarri in unflattering terms as he walked out for a session. When warned he might be overheard by the Italian, the former Manchester United trainee answered he didn’t care because his situation was set in stone anyway.

The drink-driving incident sparked more talk about what Drinkwater was getting up to in his private life. With no football to occupy him, going out had become more of a norm.

However, sources insist this shouldn’t be misconstrued as him having a drinking problem or being unprofessional. “He was a lad in his 20s,” as one friend put it. Another remarked that there were periods where no alcohol was consumed for “weeks”.

There were achievements off the pitch too, the most significant coming last March when he proudly opened his own restaurant in Manchester called Foodwell.

The chance to escape Chelsea two months earlier had been taken away. Cesc Fabregas was also keen to organise a transfer elsewhere and the club made it clear that only one of them would be let go. It was the Spaniard who got his wish, securing a switch to Monaco. But by setting up a new business, it showed Drinkwater was using some of his Chelsea fortune and spare time wisely.

A change of agent finally led to a change of scenery this season. New manager Frank Lampard involved him at the start of pre-season, yet was always going to prioritise promoting youth talent such as Mason Mount and Billy Gilmour, so a move elsewhere was inevitable.

Burnley made a bid to take him on an initial six-month loan with the view of extending it in January for the remainder of the season. The fact Chelsea agreed to pay £70,000-a-week of Drinkwater’s wages though showed just what kind of price had to be paid just for him to find a new team.

It was always going to take time for him to match the physical levels of his new team-mates, but those close to the club suggest that he fitted in well and there were no problems with the Burnley players. A full 90 minutes in the Carabao Cup against Sunderland, albeit in a 3-1 defeat, was promising.

But the nightclub incident, in which he sustained ankle ligament damage as well as bruising to his face, came just a few days later. It was a setback he never recovered from.

Drinkwater, who had been regarded as a positive influence in the dressing room up to then, made a point of speaking to the squad and acknowledged he had made a mistake. That was well received but there was just one more outing for Burnley after that: his first Premier League appearance for 21 months was not one to remember, as Manchester City won 4-1.

Tellingly, Burnley team-mate Erik Pieters spoke positively about Drinkwater afterwards: “It takes time, but that’s normal. He didn’t play for a while, but he’s looking good, he’s feeling well. He’s a great guy, he’s funny. He fits perfectly.”

Sources suggest it was Drinkwater’s decision to cut short his loan at Burnley because he wanted more game time — another sign that he wasn’t just content to just pick up a pay cheque.

That is when Villa came calling. From manager Dean Smith, to assistant and former Chelsea defender John Terry to those in the hierarchy, Drinkwater’s experience was regarded as an asset in their relegation battle.

Only four starts, in which he has been subbed all four times, have followed, though. The first came in a humiliating 6-1 reverse at home to Manchester City and the last was over a month ago.

One can only guess what was in his mind when he squared up to Jota during a six-a-side game, but perhaps all the frustration of what he’s been through over the last three seasons came to the surface.

Who knows what will happen next? There are still two years left on his Chelsea contract, yet there is little chance of forcing his way back into contention there.

But following two disappointing loans this season, both overshadowed by controversy, there won’t be many clubs queuing up to buy or borrow him either.

Drinkwater can still turn things around, but time is beginning to run out.

You know The Athletic are running out of topics to write at this point of time when there's something like this on Drinkwater and FIVE writers contributed to the piece!

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6 minutes ago, Jason said:

You know The Athletic are running out of topics to write at this point of time when there's something like this on Drinkwater and FIVE writers contributed to the piece!

I know!!

and I just renewed my subscription a month ago or so!!

GRRRR

at least all you can read their stuffs here

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2 minutes ago, Vesper said:

I know!!

and I just renewed my subscription a month ago or so!!

GRRRR

at least all you can read their stuffs here

I subscribe to it too. So, I don't care. :P 

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