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Finally have internet so I'll be posting more. In other news here is some photos of my son

Talking of marriage and seeing as the thread is already de-railed - I got married at the weekend It was amazing - hired a marquee and had Dodgems and a carousel along with a double decker bus convert

Just got thrown out of my local swimming pool (luckily theres more than one). Anyway in the foyer coming out, there was a lifesize cardboard Gerrard, advertising some sports drink or something. At the

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  • 2 months later...

‘Anti-5G’ Necklaces Worn by Conspiracy Theorists Are Actually Radioactive, Nuclear Experts Warn

😜

https://www.thedailybeast.com/anti-5g-necklaces-worn-by-conspiracy-theorists-are-actually-radioactive-nuclear-experts-warn?ref=home

Nuclear experts are warning that jewelry marketed to protect wearers against 5G is actually radioactive. “Don’t wear it any more,” the Dutch authority for nuclear safety and radiation protection instructed, per the BBC. “Put it away safely and wait for the return instructions.” The “anti-5G” devices, like bracelets and necklaces, supply a demand created by conspiracy theories that claim 5G phone networks are dangerous to human health. The World Health Organization has promised that 5G, like its preceding 3 and 4G, is perfectly safe—no amulets needed. Of the items that the authorities identified as giving off “harmful ionising radiation” are an “Energy Armor” necklace and a children's bracelet called “Magnetix Wellness.”

 

Read it at BBC

 

Gone Insane GIF - Gone Insane Crazy - Discover & Share GIFs

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‘The Fuse Has Been Blown,’ and the Doomsday Glacier Is Coming for Us All

New data suggests a massive collapse of the ice shelf in as little as five years. “We are dealing with an event that no human has ever witnessed,” says one scientist. “We have no analog for this”

https://www.rollingstone.com/politics/politics-features/doomsday-glacier-thwaites-antarctica-climate-crisis-1273841/

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One thing that’s hard to grasp about the climate crisis is that big changes can happen fast. In 2019, I was aboard the Nathaniel B. Palmer, a 308-foot-long scientific research vessel, cruising in front of the Thwaites Glacier in Antarctica. One day, we were sailing in clear seas in front of the glacier. The next day, we were surrounded by icebergs the size of aircraft carriers.

As we later learned from satellite images, in a matter of 48 hours or so, a mélange of ice about 21 miles wide and 15 miles deep had cracked up and scattered into the sea.

It was a spooky moment. Thwaites Glacier is the size of Florida. It is the cork in the bottle of the entire West Antarctic ice sheet, which contains enough ice to raise sea levels by 10 feet. The mélange that disintegrated was not part of the glacier itself, but a mix of icebergs and sea ice that had cozied up next to it. Still, the idea that it could just fall apart overnight was mind-blowing.

As it turns out, the ice breakup I witnessed was not a freak event. A few weeks ago, scientists participating in the International Thwaites Glacier Collaboration, a $25 million five-year-long joint research program between the National Science Foundation in the U.S. and the Natural Environment Research Council in the U.K., presented their latest research. They described the discovery of cracks and fissures in the Thwaites eastern ice shelf, predicting that the ice shelf could fracture like a shattered car window in as little as five years. “It won’t scatter out into sea as quickly as what you saw when you were down there,” Erin Pettit, a glaciologist at Oregon State University and one of the lead principal investigators in the ITGC, later told me. “But the basic process is the same. The ice shelf is breaking up and could be gone in less than a decade.”

Given the ongoing war for American democracy and the deadly toll of the Covid pandemic, the loss of an ice shelf on a far-away continent populated by penguins might not seem to be big news. But in fact, the West Antarctic ice sheet is one of the most important tipping points in the Earth’s climate system. If Thwaites Glacier collapses, it opens the door for the rest of the West Antarctic ice sheet to slide into the sea. Globally, 250 million people live within three feet of high tide lines. Ten feet of sea level rise would be a world-bending catastrophe. It’s not only goodbye Miami, but goodbye to virtually every low-lying coastal city in the world.

But predicting the breakup of ice sheets and the implications for future sea level rise is fraught with uncertainty. Depending on various emissions scenarios in the latest Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change report, we could have as little as one foot of sea level rise by the end of the century, or nearly six feet of sea level rise (of course, rising seas won’t stop in 2100, but that date has become a common benchmark). “The difference between those [models] is a lot of lives and money,” says Richard Alley, a glaciologist at Penn State University and one of the great ice scientists of our time. Alley adds: “The most likely place to generate [the worst scenario] is Thwaites.”

Or to put it more urgently: “If there is going to be a climate catastrophe,” Ohio State glaciologist Ian Howat once told me, “it’s probably going to start at Thwaites.”

The problem is, understanding what’s going on at Thwaites is fiendishly complex. As I wrote in 2017:

The trouble with Thwaites, which is one of the largest glaciers on the planet, is that it’s also what scientists call “a threshold system.” That means instead of melting slowly like an ice cube on a summer day, it is more like a house of cards: It’s stable until it is pushed too far, then it collapses.

Thwaites is very different from other big glaciers, such as those in Greenland. For one thing, it is not melting from above, due to warmer air temperatures. It’s melting from below, due to warmer ocean water eating away at its underbelly. More importantly, the terrain beneath the West Antarctic ice sheet is peculiar. “Think of it as a giant soup bowl filled with ice,” Sridhar Anandakrishnan, an expert in polar glaciology at Penn State University, once told me. In the bowl analogy, the edge of the glacier — the spot where a glacier leaves the land and begins to float — is perched on the lip of the bowl 1,000 feet or more below sea level. Scientists call that lip the “grounding line.” Below the lip, the terrain falls away on a downward slope for hundreds of miles, all the way to the Transantarctic Mountains that divide East and West Antarctica. At the deepest part of the basin, the ice is about two miles thick.

What this means is that once the warm water gets below ice, it can flow down the slope of the bowl, weakening the ice from below. Through a mechanism called “marine ice-cliff Instability,” you can get what amounts to a runaway collapse of the ice sheet that could raise global sea levels very high, very fast.

That’s why, when I wrote my 2017 Rolling Stone story about Thwaites, I dubbed it “The Doomsday Glacier.” (The name stuck — if you type the phrase into Google now, you get half a million hits.)

In a worst-case scenario, how fast could Thwaites collapse? No one knows. The IPCC data is the best guide for sea level rise for the rest of this century, although Alley cautions me that even six feet of sea level rise by 2100 is not the worst-case scenario.

“We just don’t know what the upper boundary is for how fast this can happen,” Alley says. “We are dealing with an event that no human has ever witnessed before. We have no analog for this.”

In the past few years, scientists have made a lot of progress in understanding the dynamics of Thwaites. On our 2019 cruise, scientists discovered troughs in the seabed that allowed warm water to flow underneath the ice shelf. Scientists have mapped the underside of the glacier itself, tracked crevasses in the ice shelf, and located pinning points that might slow the retreat of the ice. The change has been dramatic: “The net rate of ice loss from Thwaites Glacier is more than six times what it was in the early 1990s,” says Rob Larter, a geophysicist with the British Antarctic Survey who was the chief scientist on my trip to Antarctica in 2019.

The recent news about Thwaites’ eastern ice shelf breaking up in the next five years was not really a surprise to anyone who has been tracking the science closely. After the sudden disintegration of the Larsen B ice shelf in 2002, scientists realized that Antarctica was far less stable than many had believed. The discovery of cracks and fissures at Thwaites further underscore just how dynamic the changes already underway are.

erin-petit-Crack-in-Thwaites-Ice-ShelfEr

A newly discovered fissure in the Thwaites ice shelf. Scientists predict the shelf could crack like a car window in five years.

 

To be clear, there is a big difference between an ice shelf and the glacier itself. The ice shelf is like a thumbnail that grows out from the glacier and floats on the ocean. Because it is already floating, when it melts it doesn’t in itself contribute to sea level rise (just as when ice cubes melt in your glass, they don’t raise the level of liquid).

But ice shelves are important because they buttress glaciers. Like the flying buttresses of Notre Dame, they give the walls of ice stability. And when they break up, the land-based glacier is free to flow much faster into the sea. And that does raise sea levels.

So yeah, if Thwaites loses a significant part of its ice shelf in five years, that’s a big deal.

But even if a big part of the ice shelf does crack up, there is a lot of unknown complexity in how it will play out. “A first question is, if the ice-shelf breakage continues, will the whole ice shelf be lost, or will a short ice shelf remain, at least in some places?” Richard Alley emailed me. “Almost all ice-shelf ice is buttressing, generating friction that holds back the non-floating ice, so loss of part, most or all of the ice shelf will increase flow of non-floating ice into the ocean. But the most-important buttressing tends to arise closest to the grounding zone, so if a short ice shelf does remain, it may still provide important buttressing, and the speedup of flow and thinning will be smaller than they could be with full ice-shelf loss.”

Here you see the problem. Even predicting how the crackup of the ice shelf will impact the flow of the glacier is difficult to estimate.

And this is only one of the uncertainties that scientists face when trying to predict whether or not Miami will be underwater by 2100. There is further uncertainty in exactly where and when the ice will fracture, how much warm water will be pushed up beneath the glacier by changing winds and ocean currents, how the character of the bed the glacier rests on will speed up or slow down the glacier’s slide into the sea. Whether the bed is hard rock or muddy till can have a big impact on the velocity of the glacier, just as the texture of snow affects how fast you ski down a mountain. “Ice is alive,” says Pettit. “It moves and flows and breaks in ways that are difficult to anticipate.”

Paradoxically, the more scientists learn about what’s going on at Thwaites, the more divergent the latest climate models have become about its future. Consider the results of two models by highly respected scientists published side by side in Nature earlier this year. One model suggests that Thwaites stays fairly stable until temperatures rise above 2 C of warming. Then all hell breaks loose. Thwaites begins to fall into the sea like a line of dominoes pushed off a table and soon takes the rest of the West Antarctic ice sheet with it. And once the collapse begins, according to this model, it will be impossible to stop — at least on any human time scale. In a century or so, global sea levels could rise 10 feet, which would swamp South Florida and Bangladesh and many other low-lying regions of the world.

In the other model, global sea level rise only differs by 4½ inches between a 1.5 C global temperature rise and a 3 C temperature rise (which is a little above where we are headed with under current emissions scenarios). And much of that comes from increased melt in Greenland and mountain glaciers. As for Antarctica, the paper says explicitly: “No clear dependence on emissions scenario emerges for Antarctica.”

So what to make of all this?

“The current divergence among model predictions is actually a good sign because it means that scientists are probing different parameterizations, representations of processes, and hypotheses,” writes Jeremy Bassis, a geophysicist at the University of Michigan. Bassis suggests not focusing so much on the long-term uncertainty and highlighting instead what scientists know about the next few decades. “The skill of models in predicting sea level change on decadal time scales is high, and we already have actionable projections on these time scales. We should be emphasizing that fact in discussions with community members, stakeholders, and decision-makers, so they can move ahead with important adaptation and mitigation planning.”

But in the long run, it is not clear that the dynamics of ice sheet collapse that are underway at Thwaites can be stopped. As glaciologist Eric Rignot put it in 2015, in Antarctica, “the fuse has been blown.” Even if we cut carbon emissions to zero tomorrow, warm water will continue to flow beneath the ice sheet for decades, destabilizing the ice and further pushing the glacier toward eventual collapse. This doesn’t means that cutting carbon pollution to zero isn’t an important goal — nothing, in fact, is more important or more urgent. “We may have a small safety margin in Antarctica, but not a large one,” says Alley. Even if the fuse is blown, cutting emissions fast could slow it all down to a millennium-long crack-up that will give us more time to adapt. One way or another, our future is written in ice.

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Opera star delighted by stranger who stood up in the audience and started singing with her

https://www.upworthy.com/opera-students-sings-duet-with-lisette-oropesa-from-audience

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There's a certain etiquette that audience members generally adhere to while watching a live performance, and that goes doubly for the opera world. But you don't have to be an opera-goer to know that it's generally frowned upon—to put it lightly—for a member of the audience to stand up and start singing right in the middle of an opera singer's performance.

It ain't Lollapalooza, for crying out loud.

But an audience member adding his voice to an opera performance was exactly what happened at the Verdi Festival in Parma, Italy this past fall. According to Classic FM, renowned soprano Lisette Oropesa was performing an encore at the end of her recital, singing the female part from "Sempre Libera" (Always Free) from Verdi's "La traviata." The song is a duet, usually sung between a female soprano and a male tenor, but she was performing it solo. So when the tenor part arrived and no one sang opposite her, 24-year-old Liu Jianwei, a fan of Oropesa and a student of opera at the Conservatorio Giuseppe Nicolini di Piacenza, stood up and filled in the gap.

No one expected it. Not Oropesa. Not even Liu himself, apparently. But the pianist kept playing and Oropesa appeared to be delighted as the young man beautifully filled in the tenor part. Oropesa's initial "Oh," is written into the piece (though you can see her searching the audience for where the man's voice was coming from), but the "Oh, grazie," she added herself to say thank you.

It's a good thing he had a lovely voice. Watch:

According to Classic FM, Liu took to the Chinese microblogging platform Weibo to explain himself—and to warn others not to do what he did.

“I stood up to sing because Lisette Oropesa is a musician I love very much and I happened to have learned this opera before,” he said. “It is definitely not something worthy of pride, nor something worthy of being advocated. Please don’t interrupt singers when they are singing on stage. It’s impolite behavior. Don’t imitate me and I will never do this again in the future.”

Many disagree with him on the "worthy of pride" part at least, and most people commenting on the video were thrilled with both the unexpected singing and the reaction from the opera star.

"She was so gracious and kind!! The shock and delight on her face was so wonderful!! This is beautiful," wrote one commenter.

"I love how her face just lights up, it's so sweet!!!" wrote another.

"That is the reaction of when a musician does it for the love of music," added another "They are both amazing!"

And regarding the "impolite" bit:

"Look I know it would technically be considered rude but he shot his shot and was successful 😂. Can’t blame him one bit.".

Liu approached Oropesa after the concert to apologize. She took photos with him and gave him her autograph.

Brava and bravo to them both.

 

 

 
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Yesterday was my first day riding a Onewheel. Low grade video of me riding around my neighborhood. I used my wife's scrunchy to afix my cell phone to an eight iron for a selfie stick.

 

 

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14 minutes ago, ZAPHOD2319 said:

Yesterday was my first day riding a Onewheel. Low grade video of me riding around my neighborhood. I used my wife's scrunchy to afix my cell phone to an eight iron for a selfie stick.

 

 

Haha brilliant. Future transport !

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16 minutes ago, ZAPHOD2319 said:

Yesterday was my first day riding a Onewheel. Low grade video of me riding around my neighborhood. I used my wife's scrunchy to afix my cell phone to an eight iron for a selfie stick.

 

 

looks like a lot of fun, BUT

why the RED shirt m8! 

lolol (I am just having a laugh)

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Roughly 21% of Generation Z Americans who have reached adulthood -- those born between 1997 and 2003 -- identify as LGBT. That is nearly double the proportion of millennials who do so, while the gap widens even further when compared with older generations.

https://news.gallup.com/poll/389792/lgbt-identification-ticks-up.aspx

Lesbians.gif by die-s on DeviantArt

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Jamal Edwards: Tributes flood in for music entrepreneur

https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-60457063

Prince Charles and rappers Dave and AJ Tracey are among the many voices paying tribute to entrepreneur and YouTube star Jamal Edwards.

Jamal Edwards and Prince Charles

Edwards, who has died at the age of 31, is the son of singer and presenter Brenda Edwards, who said she was "completely devastated".

The Prince of Wales paid tribute to his work for The Prince's Trust.

Dave simply wrote: "Thank you for everything. Words can't explain" while Tracey said he was a "legend".

Edwards was the founder of SBTV, an online grime and rap music platform which helped launch the careers of artists like Dave, Ed Sheeran and Skepta. He first got into film-making after his parents gave him a video camera as a Christmas present when he was 15.

Born in Luton and later moving to west London, he was appointed an MBE for services to music in 2014. A pioneering figure in British rap and grime music, Edwards attended the Brit Awards earlier this month, and was understood to have performed as a DJ at a gig in north London on Saturday night.

His company confirmed his death to the BBC on Sunday, saying he died that morning. His mother said he "passed away after a sudden illness".

 

 
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Went to an Atlanta United game on Sunday. It was nice that Atlanta won 3-1. It was our first game since the team moved into Mercedes Benz stadium a few season ago. Wow what a spectacular job the owner Arthur Blank did. It seats 75,000 and we were blown away that a soda was just $2 and you can refill it as many times as you want. In the old Georgia Stadium they were $4-$8. Menu items $2-$4, with meals $8-$15. My son looked it up because just a hotdog was $8 before. Arthur Blank leased Georgia Stadium and had no say in concessions. When he had Mercedes Benz built, he did not renew any food vendors and if necessary would have all the food services handled by his people at regular prices. He invited vendors back on one condition, they can only charge the prices they charge at their own chain restaurants. No jacking up the prices at Games. There were plenty of chain restaurants with facilities there. 
 

I have never attended a stadium where we didn’t pay a premium for food and drink. The beer is even reasonable…. but total shit from Coors and the rest.C7583273-A905-4B4A-AFF2-85AABE3A0201.thumb.jpeg.757314998244319e4ac20a06124278e5.jpeg605BD48D-2A00-49F5-81D3-976A98F97A3F.thumb.jpeg.f02aa160feb2e8f0945b3d129ec5ef54.jpegCF66F597-68AF-49FD-9DD9-1C923D1F1325.thumb.jpeg.b83c70e607dd6004dd10d4cd0a5a7f39.jpeg 

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Nürburgring Nordschleife 'The Green Hell'

All-Time Fastest Lap Ever

Car: Porsche 911 GT2 RS with Manthey Performance Kit (and it is street legal!)

Time: 20.8 km in 6:43.300 min

(Smashed the previous record held by a McLaren P1 LM by around 4 seconds)

 

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The Koenigsegg Jesko Absolut Can Do 330 MPH (532 KMH) in Theory, But it Needs Space

We spoke with Christian von Koenigsegg to learn all about this remarkable streamliner.

https://www.roadandtrack.com/new-cars/a31246635/koenigsegg-absolut-top-speed-test-possibiltiy/

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Koenigsegg is chasing 300 mph in dramatic fashion. The Jesko Absolut is the Swedish company's idea of a high-speed streamliner, with a drag coefficient of 0.278 and 1600 horsepower from a twin-turbo V-8. It's Koenigsegg's answer to the 304-mph Bugatti Chiron Super Sport 300+.

The Absolut should be very fast, but the exact top speed remains unknown, as Koenigsegg hasn't tested it. Speaking to Road & Track on the phone, company founder Christian von Koenigsegg said he believes the automaker will be ready to do a top-speed run within a year, but he's not sure where it'll be held. The section of Nevada highway closed for the Agera RS's 277-mph run in 2017 isn't quite smooth enough for the speeds the Jesko Absolut is capable of hitting, which should be very high.

"If you run the numbers, you take the frontal area, the cd, the power, the gear ratio, the power curve... the simulations say 532 km/h (330 mph), or something like that," Koenigsegg said. "It's of course a theoretical number, but that's what simulation tells us. We don't really have ambition to drive that fast. The end result will be location, driver willingness, and car's capability. But theoretically, it looks extremely fast."

We asked if the Johnny Bohmer Proving Grounds—a repurposed three-mile space-shuttle runway in Florida—would be suitable. "It's perfect, apart that it's not long enough. We can go maybe 85 percent of the car's top speed there." Koenigsegg said. "The problem is when you start reaching your top speed, and you want to get your last 5-10 mph, they come very, very slowly while the car is flying forward and just consuming miles so quickly."

Arguably, the best place in the world to do such a test is Volkswagen's Ehra-Lessien proving grounds, where Bugatti set its 304-mph record. Unfortunately, Koenigsegg doesn't have access to such a facility.

Amazingly, Koenigsegg doesn't think tires will be an issue. The company test spun the tires used on the Agera RS to 330 mph for a minute without an issue. "Michelin, when they were there during our testing, they didn't believe their eyes. How kind our cars are to their tires." Koenigsegg engineers will verify that the Absolut's tires will be able to handle the speeds if the opportunity to test comes up, but Christian isn't worried.

bea1d4b997e49a1c-org-1583427522.jpg?resize=768:*

The Jesko Absolut (left) and the standard Jesko (right).
KOENIGSEGG

Even if the Jesko Absolut never gets to break the 300-mph barrier, it still represents an amazing engineering achievement. Its 0.278 drag coefficient is remarkably low when considering the fact that it has wide tires and high cooling requirements for the brakes and drivetrain. "We did not expect to get this low," Koenigsegg said.

The back wheels have removable covers that add around 4-5 mph to the Jesko Absolut's top speed, while the rear wing is gone and the rear clamshell has been smoothed and extended. Two vertical fins help increase high-speed stability and reduce drag, while the splitter and dive planes are removed for the Absolut.

Koenigsegg will price the Jesko Absolut higher than the more track-focused version released last year because of the increased investment it took to get the drag coefficient so low, and the expected cost of high-speed testing. Just 125 examples of the Jesko will be built, and Koenigsegg said he doesn't yet know how many customers will go for the Absolut, as the configurator was just sent out recently.

So will the Jesko Absolut beat Bugatti? Who knows. But what is certain is that after the Jesko Absolut is finished, Koenigsegg will exit the top-speed chase.

"This is the fastest Koenigsegg we will ever endeavor to make," Koenigsegg said at the car's reveal.

Engine

  • Koenigsegg twin turbo aluminum 5,0 L V8, 4 valves per cylinder, flat-plane crankshaft, double overhead camshafts, dry sump lubrication
  • Compression: 8.6:1
  • Bore: 92 mm Stroke: 95.25 mm
  • Sequential, multipoint fuel injection with individual cylinder pressure sensors and back pressure sensors
  • Closed loop individual combustion and lambda control, twin ceramic ball bearing turbo chargers with Koenigsegg response system.
  • 1.7 bar boost pressure (2.2 bar with E85)
  • Dry sump lubrication. Carbon fiber intake manifold with optimized intake tracts
  • Tig-welded ceramic coated 0.8 mm wall thickness Inconel exhaust system manifold with merge collector
  • Total engine weight: 189 kg

ENGINE MANAGEMENT

  • Koenigsegg Engine Control Module
  • Flex fuel capability (optional)
  • High power coil-on-plug ignition system

OUTPUT

  • Gasoline: 955 kW (1280 bhp) at 7800 rpm, redline at 8500 rpm.
  • E85: 1195 kW (1600 bhp)
  • Torque: 1000 Nm from 2700 to 6170 rpm
  • Max torque: 1500 Nm at 5100 rpm

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A bespoke (hand built engine, the most powerful normally aspirated V8 ever made, and it has a flat plane crankshaft, carbon fibre all over, etc) supercar for only around £70-75K

AND they are making a right-hand drive version as well

This is the first yank car in ages I would consider buying.

Exclusive First Drive: 2023 Corvette Z06 with the Z07 performance-package | Jay Leno's Garage

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New Lotus Elise Sport 240 Final Edition 💚

https://www.rybrook.co.uk/lotus/new-cars/elise-sport-240-final-edition/

2021 Lotus Elise Sport 240 final edition 620474

 Lotus Elise Sport 240 Final Edition

Going. But not going quietly.

The Elise is as beautifully simple, pleasingly compact and bristling with energy and feedback . Built around an extruded and bonded aluminium chassis, the Elise is the perfect lightweight sports car for the drive. Going. But not going quietly. A host of new features are added to the Final Edition to celebrate its last year of production.

£45,500

Design

The icon, re-invigorated. One of the purest, most engaging sports cars ever built takes a major step forward in the Elise Sport 240 Final Edition. The exposed gearshift is a work of aluminium art in its own right, now as precise and satisfying to use as it is to look at. In its 25th and final year of the production, the Elise is truly looking at its finest.

2021 Lotus Elise Sport 240 final edition 620475

Performance

The new Elise Sport 240 Final Edition feels nimble and capable, as any Lotus sports car should. Delivering 240bhp, this specially tuned engine provides a balance of performance and class-leading efficiency. To accelerate from 0-60 mph takes just 4.1 seconds thanks to its 257bph/ton power to weight ratio. And the handling just has to be experienced.

2021 Lotus Elise Sport 240 final edition 620476

Final Edition

For the Final Edition, a host of new features have been added, including unique paint choices, new exterior decals and two new wheel finishes. The biggest changes can be found to the interior, where a new TFT instrument cluster, final edition build plaque, new steering wheel design and new seat trims have been added. Customise your new Elise Sport 240 Final Edition with these intricate and unique details whilst maintaining the core values of this iconic sports car.

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On 28/02/2022 at 17:14, ZAPHOD2319 said:

Went to an Atlanta United game on Sunday. It was nice that Atlanta won 3-1. It was our first game since the team moved into Mercedes Benz stadium a few season ago. Wow what a spectacular job the owner Arthur Blank did. It seats 75,000 and we were blown away that a soda was just $2 and you can refill it as many times as you want. In the old Georgia Stadium they were $4-$8. Menu items $2-$4, with meals $8-$15. My son looked it up because just a hotdog was $8 before. Arthur Blank leased Georgia Stadium and had no say in concessions. When he had Mercedes Benz built, he did not renew any food vendors and if necessary would have all the food services handled by his people at regular prices. He invited vendors back on one condition, they can only charge the prices they charge at their own chain restaurants. No jacking up the prices at Games. There were plenty of chain restaurants with facilities there. 
 

I have never attended a stadium where we didn’t pay a premium for food and drink. The beer is even reasonable…. but total shit from Coors and the rest.C7583273-A905-4B4A-AFF2-85AABE3A0201.thumb.jpeg.757314998244319e4ac20a06124278e5.jpeg605BD48D-2A00-49F5-81D3-976A98F97A3F.thumb.jpeg.f02aa160feb2e8f0945b3d129ec5ef54.jpegCF66F597-68AF-49FD-9DD9-1C923D1F1325.thumb.jpeg.b83c70e607dd6004dd10d4cd0a5a7f39.jpeg 

that stadium is amazing

and those prices, wow!

that Atlanta United team won the championship a few years back

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that Portland team probably has some the craziest footie fans in the states, from what I have seen

 

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