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Vesper
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Guys, i just want to say, take care of yourselves and your families during this horrible pandemic, stay safe always and God bless you all. Hug 🙏💪👊

Strange times. We've surrendered our liberty and freedom to the State. Parliament has disappeared. All private enterprise has been Nationalised. Movement controlled. All our freedom just given up with

In the US people queue up to buy guns. In the Netherlands thousands of people were today queueing to buy weed before all coffee shops (and restaurants, cafes etc.) closed down at 6pm and will remain s

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Bernardeschi: Little by little we were losing our values. This is a wake-up call

https://theathletic.com/1777559/2020/04/28/federico-bernardeschi-juventus-coronavirus-charity-environment/

BERNARDESCHI-scaled-e1587997010485-1024x683.jpg

Federico Bernardeschi is sitting on his balcony in Turin. The sun is shining. “It’s 20 degrees,” he says. One of his bulldogs, Spike, barks in the background. The 26-year-old politely introduces us over our video call and gives the pooch a pat on the head. “He’s got a ball now. He’s happy.”

It’s a picture of normal life in abnormal circumstances. As of the weekend, there have been almost 200,000 cases of COVID-19 in Italy. Bernardeschi’s Juventus team-mates Daniele Rugani, Paulo Dybala and Blaise Matuidi all tested positive. But the country is turning a corner and after nearly two months of lockdown, the government has announced it will begin lifting some restrictions next week.

The crisis has left a profound impression on Bernardeschi, who remains in self-isolation but doesn’t live in a bubble. “Every morning at 8:30, I turn on the news. It’s the first thing I do,” the winger tells The Athletic. “Information is really important. You have to be aware of what’s going on around you and I always hold out hope there’ll be some good news when maybe yesterday, there wasn’t any. Gradually, we’re coming through the other side of it but we’re still in for the long haul.”

The Athletic is talking to Bernardeschi on April 25 — Liberation Day in Italy, commemorating the victory of the resistance at the end of World War II. Later in the afternoon, Italy’s president Sergio Mattarella cut a lonely but dignified figure walking down the steps of the Vittoriano monument in Rome in a protective mask after laying a wreath at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier. At the same ceremony a year ago, he called the liberation Italy’s second Risorgimento (Resurgence) after the unification of the states into one country in 1861. Freedom from COVID-19 could yet be its third.

“I get goosebumps talking about the doctors and nurses, and everyone who is risking their lives to help their neighbour,” Bernardeschi, who has scored four goals in 24 appearances for the national team, says. “I have to say what our healthcare workers have done and continue to do is a miracle of humankind.”

Bernardeschi donated €50,000 to the Gradenigo hospital in Turin and raised another €80,000 through GoFundMe for eight sub-intensive care beds and other necessary equipment. Perplexingly, having a social conscience is something Bernardeschi and former Juventus midfielder Claudio Marchisio have been criticised for in some quarters. They have been called “buonista” — virtue-signalling, politically correct do-gooders — by an element of Juventus’s ultras, who seem to have a problem with them using their platforms to shine a light on a variety of different social issues, not to mention calling out anti-immigration rhetoric.

Federico Bernardeschi beds Turin hospital

Bernardeschi helped to raise money to purchase these intensive care beds and equipment for Gradenigo hospital in Turin

 

“When someone, as you say, calls me ‘buonista’, for me, it’s a compliment,” Bernardeschi insists. “The world today needs more humanity and less selfishness when it comes to all the choices and big decisions we make at government and political level. Right now, we should be thinking about the families going through hard times rather than just looking at our own backyard. I hope this situation makes us understand that.”

The economic repercussions of the pandemic are placing ordinary households under tremendous stress and strain. Some are struggling to put food on the table and the footage from supermarkets of customers breaking down in tears, unable to pay for groceries, moved Bernardeschi. “I was watching a video on my phone with my partner (Veronica) and we both said to each other, ‘Damn, this is a major emergency’. We saw people who were unable do their shopping because they’d run out of money.”

It made Bernardeschi think of Caffe Sospeso, an time-old Neapolitan tradition of paying not for one coffee but two, so someone less fortunate than you can get one on the house. He wondered if the same might be possible in supermarkets — a Spesa Sospeso — whereby customers could make a donation of between €2 and €5 to cover the cost of essential groceries such as pasta, rice, milk and bread for those in need. Carrefour agreed to partner with him, as did Banco Alimentare, a charity that redistributes unsold food to the homeless. They’ll be delivering the Spesa Sospeso to the most vulnerable.

“I know what it means to see your parents struggling because it’s the end of the month and there’s no money left,” says Bernardeschi. “And all the while, they’re still doing everything to help you realise your ambitions and make your dreams come true.”

Bernardeschi became a father in August and one silver lining of lockdown is the time he has got to spend with his daughter, Deva. “I get up, get ready and make breakfast. I pick my baby girl up and get her to help me. I show her everything I’m doing. I’m with her for about an hour and then I do my first training session of the day. I shower, have some lunch and then, from one till six, I’m with her all afternoon. We play and then I put her down for a nap and watch some TV, like La Casa de Papel (Money Heist on Netflix). I started (basketball documentary) The Last Dance.”

Bernardeschi reaches for the guitar, too. “More than playing it, I’d call it plucking at it. I strum. I’m a big AC/DC fan. Back In Black is on the playlist when we run out at the Allianz Stadium. I like the Red Hot Chili Peppers, Nirvana…” Bernardeschi’s desire to nail Pink Floyd’s Wish You Were Here on guitar — the Italy international’s favourite song — was probably a bit too ambitious. “I need a teacher,” he says.

Art fascinates him. His former Fiorentina team-mate Manuel Pasqual is a collector and shares former England manager Fabio Capello’s love of Lucio Fontana’s slashed canvases. “Berna” is more a street art kind of guy, though. “Banksy’s a genius,” he says. “Usually, artists only make it big after they die but Banksy’s managed to do it while he’s still alive. He’s famous and yet no one knows who he is. It’s madness. The man’s a genius in art and in marketing.”

At six o’clock, Bernardeschi trains again. Revised government guidelines indicate teams will only return to practice on May 18 and even then, it’s unclear whether group sessions and ball-work will be permitted. For now, the commute to Juventus’ Continassa facility will have to wait. “After the session, we have some dinner together, I put my daughter to bed and we put a film on. We go to bed destroyed. My daughter destroys us,” Bernardeschi laughs. “We’re in bed by 10. Then the morning comes and it starts all over again.”

As Italy’s sports papers speculate about his future with Juventus, Bernardeschi thinks about his daughter’s. Fatherhood has given him a renewed sense of purpose and perspective. “I work today for the world she’ll live in tomorrow. That’s how I think about it,” he says. “Doing something positive for her and every generation that comes after us.”

The pause caused by the pandemic presents a chance to rethink how we behave as a society and what we prioritise. It could serve as a teachable moment. “Little by little, we were losing our values,” Bernardeschi says. “For a long time now, we haven’t respected the environment, we haven’t respected ourselves, we haven’t respected our neighbours. We’ve been selfish. I think this situation will make us reflect on what the world could be like in the future. It’s a wake-up call for everyone. We’re guests on this planet. We have to ensure everything that surrounds us is in harmony with nature.”

Bernardeschi hopes the solidarity and compassion of the last couple of months lasts long after the pandemic is over.

“It was really emotional seeing all of Italy on their balconies at six o’clock singing the national anthem,” he says. “It means we are united as a country, that we’re a beautiful country. I hope that, as soon as this is all over, we can go back to the piazze (squares) and celebrate, sing, shout and rejoice at having got through it all.”

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Boris is apparently going to do a public address on Sunday evening laying out the plans of an exit. Sounds like May 26th for places like shops, Construction workers and warehouses but those who can work from home must do so.

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Theres also meant to be anti body testing coming into place which would be a boost. 

They've got to start lifting things at some point,Furlough cant last forever and be nothing to open up otherwise. Long as it's done sensibly 

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Good so it seems like all over the world we are slowly open up this month. 

So by June we should be up an running with obviously a lot of protocols and what not. 

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1 hour ago, Fulham Broadway said:

Most of the big sites in London with construction companies that donate to the tory party have been working as usual with hardly any protection for the workers. Profit before peoples health is what they care about.

Considering the lack of protection for hospital workers that doesnt surprise me

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Hot-desking banned, separate with screens, canteens closed and over-70s and the obese working from home under leaked plans to reopen offices that could remain in place for a YEAR

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-8286345/UKs-work-blueprint-Hot-desking-banned-no-sharing-pens-canteens-closed.html

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36 minutes ago, Vesper said:

Hot-desking banned, separate with screens, canteens closed and over-70s and the obese working from home under leaked plans to reopen offices that could remain in place for a YEAR

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-8286345/UKs-work-blueprint-Hot-desking-banned-no-sharing-pens-canteens-closed.html

Lol the DM has 'could' in almost all its Covid stories. 

One comment they don't like that I keep putting on each story... 'Headline should read ''Billionaire Media owner who has never paid a penny of tax, continues to divide people from his sprawling 224 acre Estate''. 

It's started to get a lot of green arrows now though ! Just sowing seeds......

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I love the Daily Mail and their team of scientist. They know what's going on before the actual announcements...

Ohhhh this is happening 

Now this...the opposite of what we said.

Feel sorry for the 3000 odd virgin staff who have been made redundant.

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Under Lockdown, Parents Are Discovering Their Children Are LGBT And Dumping Them On The Street

“They’re trapped in the house, cooped up, and haven’t got anyone to let their frustrations out on."

https://www.buzzfeed.com/patrickstrudwick/coronavirus-lockdown-lgbt-domestic-abuse-teens?ref=bfnsplash#

LGBT parents are suffering homophobic and transphobic abuse from their own children during the lockdown, a charity has revealed — while young LGBT people are being thrown out onto the street by parents who discover their child’s sexuality or gender identity.

While homelessness caused by anti-LGBT rejection is not new, the context within this pandemic is, and so too is abuse from children directed at their own LGBT parents.

Teenagers who have never said such things before are now “lashing out” with hateful and abusive comments, Rachel Ellis from the LGBT Foundation told BuzzFeed News. “They’re trapped in the house, cooped up, and haven’t got anyone to let their frustrations out on except their parents,” she said.

Some parents, who have already experienced significant prejudice outside the home, are now blaming themselves for what is happening within it — unable to comprehend why. Despite years of casework, Ellis had never encountered this phenomenon before the lockdown. But, she said, “it’s something I’m seeing more and more in the past month”.

And that is just the start.

In a series of interviews with BuzzFeed News, organisations that help LGBT victims of domestic abuse, as well as a recent survivor of abuse, warn of an array of new dangers this community is facing under lockdown.

The charities said the threats posed by being shut in can be distinct from the general population, often detonating the intolerance that might normally lie dormant. As a result, LGBT people are now at escalated risk of violence, hate crimes, grooming, and in particular, homelessness, they warned.

“You’re dead to me,” were the last words one girl heard last week as her clothes were stuffed into bin bags and thrown into the road, a youth worker from the Albert Kennedy Trust told BuzzFeed News.

But when made homeless and offered temporary housing — as the government has said all now should be — many are too afraid to accept it, fearing anti-LGBT hostility at shelters or B&Bs, and opting instead to sleep rough, in a car, or at a bus shelter.

snip

 

;( -OR- :cry:

 

 

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44 minutes ago, Laylabelle said:

I love the Daily Mail and their team of scientist. They know what's going on before the actual announcements...

 

Nobel Prize in their future!!

:rofl:

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Captain Tom Moore receives gold Blue Peter badge

https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-england-beds-bucks-herts-52550309

Captain Tom Moore has been awarded a prestigious gold Blue Peter badge for raising almost £33m for the NHS.

The badge is the show's highest accolade and famous recipients include the Queen, Sir David Attenborough and Mary Berry.

The war veteran completed 100 laps of his Bedfordshire garden by his 100th birthday last week, receiving donations from more than 1.5m supporters.

Presenter Lindsey Russell described him as "a beacon of light".

Capt Tom's birthday on Thursday was marked with an RAF flypast and a message from the Queen.

Benjie Ingram-Moore and Captain Tom Moore

Benjie Ingram-Moore presented his grandfather with a photo of the thousands of birthday cards he has received

 

snip

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