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21 minutes ago, NikkiCFC said:

None of our players had serious injury. A couple of weeks max at the time.

Not that it matters since our next game is in 3 months at best.

So theoretically by June all of our players should be able to start for the club? 

Kante, Tammy, Pulisic and even RLC? 

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On 4/2/2020 at 0:34 AM, OhForAGreavsie said:

Interesting discussion of all things Chelsea: -

 

Very good, even the articles that come the athletic are the best. 

In fact years ago journalism was like that, methodical, a lot of analysis and what not. 

Nowadays the journalism like skysport, the guardian and what not is so sub standard of what it used to be. But the athletic is like the elite of sports journalism. 

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13 minutes ago, Fernando said:

So theoretically by June all of our players should be able to start for the club? 

Kante, Tammy, Pulisic and even RLC? 

Pretty sure they are all fit now. But when are we back in training for sure some of them will get new muscle injuries :D

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7 minutes ago, NikkiCFC said:

Pretty sure they are all fit now. But when are we back in training for sure some of them will get new muscle injuries :D

I hope they give us like 2 to 3 weeks of prea season type before restarting the season in July. 

I think finishing the season in July-August is doable. 

Giving that the virus started in Wuhan and they are already reopening their city, we can assume that it last anywhere between 2 to 3 months. We already been in lock down since March and will be all of April. This is good, hopefully by mid May we can slowly start to open things up again. And then let clubs get back into training and pre season in June. 

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https://m.spox.com/de/sport/fussball/international/england/2004/Diashows/fc-cheslsea-schnellste-spieler-seit-2013-14/hazard-hudson-odoi-ruediger-pedro.html

 

Our quickest players ranked by top speed. All above 34 kmh which is already damn fast. 2nd place is a shocker. Apparently Azpi ran 35kmh in October 2019. not bad for an old man...

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Doesn't look like the club are furloughing the staff.

https://www.skysports.com/football/news/11095/11968597/premier-league-clubs-furlough-pay-cuts-deferrals

All Chelsea players and staff are being paid as normal. Cesar Azpilicueta is involved in talks with other Premier League captains about setting up a fund to help the NHS.

Roman Abramovich is paying for The Millennium Hotel at Stamford Bridge to be used free of charge by NHS staff.

Chelsea's global charity partner Plan International is responding to the effects of Coronavirus around the world. It works in more than 70 countries.

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Good good. They can't. Smaller clubs maybe can understand as no so much of a income but for a huge club like Chelsea makes sense..and especially after how feelings been known after other clubs probably for the best.

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Chelsea hero and league record scorer Jimmy Greaves admitted to hospital :(

https://www.chelsea-news.co/2020/04/chelsea-hero-league-record-scorer-admitted-hospital/

jimmy-greaves-hero.jpg

The former Blues, England, Tottenham and West Ham striker had a severe stroke some years ago, and is now “being treated in hospital for an unspecified illness.”

The Daily Mirror report that it is not known to be coronavirus related.

Greaves came through the ranks at Chelsea before a glittering career that saw him blast his way to fourth on England’s list of top scorers.

He won the World Cup in 1966, and is Tottenham’s leading ever goalscorer, as well as the top scorer in England’s top division ever – 357.

He got 124 goals for Chelsea alone, making him one of our most prolific players even just from the early days of his career which he spent at Stamford Bridge.

We wish Jimmy all the best, and hope to see him well again as soon as possible. It takes a great man to bridge the Chelsea Spurs divide, and he manages it easily.

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The Abramovich Takeover Story
This week, host Matt Davies-Adams and our resident Chelsea trio of Liam Twomey, Simon Johnson & Dom Fifield, reflect on the most significant moment in Chelsea's recent history: When Roman Abramovich bought the club back in 2003.

Mark Taylor, corporate lawyer and one of the key players involved in the deal, reveals his first impressions of Roman, how Ken Bates really felt about the sale, how close Abramovich came to actually buying Spurs and the importance of *that* game against Liverpool...

Unsurprisingly, Jesper Grønkjær is also revealed as this week's Cult Hero!

https://theathletic.com/podcast/139-straight-outta-cobham/?episode=21

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The end of Chelsea’s Brazilian experiment

https://theathletic.com/1734901/2020/04/11/brazil-chelsea-brazilians-oscar-ramires-wallace-luiz-david-piazon-kenedy/

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At one point during a 5-0 win at Swansea on January 17, 2015, five of the 11 players Chelsea had on the pitch were capped Brazil internationals. As things stand, the figure next season is going to be zero.

Should Willian leave Chelsea as expected this year — he said in an interview with Brazilian media this week that he was off — it may not only be regarded as the departure of a dedicated servant, but also the end of an era in the club’s history.

Chelsea have had at least one capped Brazilian in their squad since Alex made his debut in 2007, but the love affair with talent from South America is in danger of fizzling out. Jorginho (who left for Italy when he was 15), and Emerson Palmieri (who moved there at 20) are still there of course, yet the connection to the land of their birth is diluted somewhat by their decision to represent the Azzurri at international level.

It is a remarkable turn of events. Stamford Bridge has danced to a bit of samba beat from the moment one of Roman Abramovich’s key advisors Piet de Visser met influential Brazilian agent Giuliano Bertolucci. The pair struck an accord, and Alex was signed by Chelsea in 2004. (He was instantly loaned out to PSV Eindhoven, where De Visser was working as a scout, due to work permit issues.)

As the defender’s representative, Bertolucci was obviously already in contact with Chelsea, but the sealing of a bond with De Visser helped him become rapidly accepted into the inner circle. He was developing a fine reputation for spotting gifted players back in his homeland. This in turn led to him setting up an alliance with Kia Joorabchian, a good acquaintance of another trusted Abramovich aide, super agent Pini Zahavi. Joorabchian, an Iranian businessman, had founded Media Sports Investments and formed a partnership with Brazilian football club Corinthians.

For all parties it represented an opportunity. Chelsea had a gateway to sign players from a country that had won five World Cups; for Bertolucci and Joorabchian, there was a wealthy European club where they could position clients, then reap the financial rewards. Some of Chelsea’s most important players of the last decade — Oscar, Ramires, David Luiz and Willian — all stem from the Bertolucci-Joorabchian stable.

willian-oscar-luiz-ramires-chelsea

Not that Abramovich relied on these two men alone. Zahavi was employed, albeit unsuccessfully, in the pursuit of Neymar from Santos in 2010, while striker Diego Costa, who led the line for Chelsea from 2014-17, is a client of Jorge Mendes.

But one by one, Chelsea’s Brazilian contingent has left and there were even reports last year, which Joorabchian denied, that his bond with the west London club had cooled markedly. There is certainly a question mark over whether Brazil will ever be so healthily represented again. Chelsea have spent in excess of £20 million in trying to find the next crown jewel among Brazil’s young players such as Lucas Piazon, Nathan, Kenedy and Wallace. The first trio have been loaned out on several occasions and have just 15 starts between them (Kenedy 13, Piazon 2, Nathan 0), while Wallace joined Figueirense last year after failing to make a single appearance.

Tim Vickery, a journalist who has covered South American football for the likes of the BBC since 1994, believes the quartet’s struggles may have led to a change of approach. “If that relationship is ending and you’re looking for reasons why, just look at the players Chelsea and England are producing now,” he tells The Athletic. “Maybe there is not the need to import Brazilians if you can have your own. Some of the recent signings from Brazil haven’t really come off. The hype around Piazon in Brazil was unbelievable but where is he now? (On loan at Portuguese club Rio Ave.) People in Brazil thought he was going to be world class. Kenedy is another.

“The way the market has gone if you’re 23 and still in Brazil, you’re considered a bit old for European clubs. They want them by 19-20. But if you buy at that age, it is such a lottery. Recently a French club came over, we don’t know who it was, but they left some notes. One of the things they observed was how poor football in the country has become. They also said the young talent may be good, but Europe is producing players just as good. Maybe that is something which is weakening the relationship — clubs like Chelsea have learnt to use their own.

“I think Willian leaving will be regarded as the end of an era at Chelsea among Brazilians. There is not the same connection anymore. No one else is coming through.”

Having spent seven seasons in west London, Willian has made a significant contribution to the winning of five major honours. However, his demand for a three-year contract has been given short shrift during negotiations and a free transfer elsewhere is now looking a certainty. In terms of who was the most successful Brazilian at Chelsea, Luiz comes out on top with six trophies. But in terms of popularity or who made the biggest impact back home, Ramires emerges as a leading contender.

Ivan Nolasco Jr is the secretary of the Barra Mansa Official Supporters Club, which is the only official one in Brazil recognised by Chelsea. He also runs the Chelsea Fans Brasil website. He states: “If I had to pick one Brazilian who will always be remembered by fans here, it would be Ramires. He was so important in the Champions League campaign in 2012, particularly against Barcelona. He played a big role in winning a trophy we had been chasing for so long.”

Rafael Franca, editor of the Chelsea Brasil website, adds: “The tragic 7-1 defeat against Germany in the 2014 World Cup semi-final ended up undermining Luiz’s reputation here. I would pick two key players: Willian, for his consistency, and Ramires, for his importance in key moments.”

Some of their other countrymen fared less well. For example, striker Alexandre Pato joined on loan from AC Milan in 2016 but made just two appearances, scoring once.

willian-oscar-luiz-ramires-chelsea

The biggest disappointment of all was also arguably the biggest arrival: 2002 World Cup-winning coach Luiz Felipe Scolari. He took over in the summer of 2008, but was gone by February the following year. What hasn’t been in doubt is the club’s training ground has proved to be a very lively place due to the presence of Brazilians, most notably Luiz and Costa. The latter is still a figure of some renown in Brazil despite defecting to Spain before the 2014 World Cup.

Willian, Ramires and Oscar were friends with them and would socialise, too, despite being regarded more as family men. Indeed, at one point they all lived on the same street near Fulham’s Craven Cottage. That was particularly helpful for wives and partners to also bond in an unfamiliar city.

When it came to organising social gatherings or making practical jokes then Luiz, who was at Chelsea from 2011-14 and 2016-19, was the main ringleader. His top floor apartment in Putney overlooking the River Thames was a regular meeting point. It helped that not only was there a great view over the English capital, but there were also an array of entertainment on offer including arcade games, a pinball machine and pool table.

Such get-togethers helped everyone improve their English as well as still enjoying the taste of food from home. However, despite being a popular figure at the club, Costa never showed any interest in learning English.

As far as Luiz was concerned, anyone was welcome at his home. On one occasion he even invited one of the groundsmen at the club’s training ground, who happened to be Brazilian, back to his place on Christmas Day to celebrate. Luiz and Costa, who was at Chelsea between 2014-17, may have been the biggest characters of all the Brazilian contingent to be purchased, but the stage had been set by right-back Juliano Belletti.

He is most famous back in Brazil for scoring the winning goal to help Barcelona win the 2006 Champions League final, yet his stay at Chelsea between 2007-10 helped raise the club’s profile. “At that time it was rare to see Brazilian players in the Premier League,” Belletti explains to The Athletic. “I was at Barcelona when I found out that Chelsea and Jose Mourinho were interested in me, but even then I knew that it was a big opportunity for me, both on a professional and personal level.

“It was incredible. The club, the fans, the city… they were great times. We went out together as a group sometimes and had family meals at each others’ houses. On rare occasions, we would go to a Brazilian restaurant. There was real friendship between us. The other players were always really interested in Brazilian culture. Music and football especially: they would ask about Brazilian players, the young guys coming through.

“Once, I organised a party for my birthday at my house. We had a Brazilian lunch: barbecue, beans, all the trimmings. Almost all of the players in the squad came. But they didn’t eat much. The next year I made Spanish food and they ate more! Didier Drogba, Florent Malouda, Ricardo Carvalho and Paulo Ferreira were always the most interested when it came to Brazilian music. We had samba on all the time. The best thing was to see the respect and admiration everyone had for Brazil.”

So could the potential absence of Brazilians damage Chelsea’s popularity in that part of the world? A survey conducted back in 2018 estimated that the club were the fifth most supported in Brazil with 320 million followers — only trailing Barcelona, Real Madrid, Paris Saint-Germain and Bayern Munich.

Joao Castelo-Branco, who is an England-based reporter for ESPN Brasil, doesn’t think the forecast is quite so severe, although agrees the loss of Willian could have an impact. “Will Chelsea keep their Brazilian fans? Definitely,” he insists. “You still see Arsenal with a huge amount of fans in Brazil (from the Invincibles era, which included Gilberto Silva and Edu Gaspar). That was the moment when the Premier League was really getting big over there. They still have a massive following over there

“Chelsea’s wave came straight after that, so the Brazilians who got into watching the Premier League at that point followed them. They also had Scolari, who is a massive character in Brazil, had won the World Cup and then come to Europe, so a lot of people wanted to see how he was doing. A lot of people liked him and wanted him to do well.

“When he came to Chelsea it was huge, because he was the first Brazilian manager in England. We haven’t got a big tradition of Brazilian managers in Europe, so him coming to the Premier League, to a club like Chelsea, was massive.

“Whether they continue to get new ones is a different story — I’d imagine now the younger generation will be looking at Liverpool and Manchester City.”

There aren’t too many signs of pessimism among their backers based in Brazil either. Franca says: “There was a real boom after the Champions League win in 2012. I’m from Rio de Janeiro and it’s quite common to see Chelsea shirts there. The fact that Chelsea had four players in Brazil’s 2014 World Cup squad (Luiz, Willian, Ramires and Oscar) was good for the club’s popularity. But the expansion of Premier League coverage on ESPN Brasil was the real game-changer. Only the Champions League can compete with the Premier League on television here. This has created a real passion for English football.”

Nolasco Jr feels similar, although is watching events with a bit more of a heavy heart. He says: “We’ve seen more and more Chelsea fans in Brazil over the last decade. More games are on television, which has helped that growth. The presence of Brazilian players has helped the Chelsea fanbase grow in Brazil ever since Alex joined. And then we had Ramires, Luiz, Oscar, Willian. They are names that captured the attention of the public, and prompted the broadcasters to show more Chelsea games. It has been really great to watch. It was always great to see Brazilians wearing the blue shirt. Many of them represented our country really well and were missed when they left.

“Willian has been an important player for Chelsea and if he does leave, Brazilians will view that as a real shame. Hopefully we’ll sign another Brazilian soon.”

Chelsea could always dip into the market in future to keep the Brazilian connection alive. There has been speculation for over a year that they are keen on Philippe Coutinho, who is another client of Joorabchian’s, and talk of a loan deal from Barcelona has intensified in recent weeks.

But the days when five were part of a title-winning squad, as they were in 2014-15 (Oscar, Ramires, Costa, Willian and Filipe Luis), are unlikely to ever be repeated.

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The end of Chelsea’s Brazilian experiment

https://theathletic.com/1734901/2020/04/11/brazil-chelsea-brazilians-oscar-ramires-wallace-luiz-david-piazon-kenedy/

At one point during a 5-0 win at Swansea on January 17, 2015, five of the 11 players Chelsea had on the pitch were capped Brazil internationals. As things stand, the figure next season is going to be zero.

Should Willian leave Chelsea as expected this year — he said in an interview with Brazilian media this week that he was off — it may not only be regarded as the departure of a dedicated servant, but also the end of an era in the club’s history.

Chelsea have had at least one capped Brazilian in their squad since Alex made his debut in 2007, but the love affair with talent from South America is in danger of fizzling out. Jorginho (who left for Italy when he was 15), and Emerson Palmieri (who moved there at 20) are still there of course, yet the connection to the land of their birth is diluted somewhat by their decision to represent the Azzurri at international level.

It is a remarkable turn of events. Stamford Bridge has danced to a bit of samba beat from the moment one of Roman Abramovich’s key advisors Piet de Visser met influential Brazilian agent Giuliano Bertolucci. The pair struck an accord, and Alex was signed by Chelsea in 2004. (He was instantly loaned out to PSV Eindhoven, where De Visser was working as a scout, due to work permit issues.)

As the defender’s representative, Bertolucci was obviously already in contact with Chelsea, but the sealing of a bond with De Visser helped him become rapidly accepted into the inner circle. He was developing a fine reputation for spotting gifted players back in his homeland. This in turn led to him setting up an alliance with Kia Joorabchian, a good acquaintance of another trusted Abramovich aide, super agent Pini Zahavi. Joorabchian, an Iranian businessman, had founded Media Sports Investments and formed a partnership with Brazilian football club Corinthians.

For all parties it represented an opportunity. Chelsea had a gateway to sign players from a country that had won five World Cups; for Bertolucci and Joorabchian, there was a wealthy European club where they could position clients, then reap the financial rewards. Some of Chelsea’s most important players of the last decade — Oscar, Ramires, David Luiz and Willian — all stem from the Bertolucci-Joorabchian stable.

Not that Abramovich relied on these two men alone. Zahavi was employed, albeit unsuccessfully, in the pursuit of Neymar from Santos in 2010, while striker Diego Costa, who led the line for Chelsea from 2014-17, is a client of Jorge Mendes.

But one by one, Chelsea’s Brazilian contingent has left and there were even reports last year, which Joorabchian denied, that his bond with the west London club had cooled markedly. There is certainly a question mark over whether Brazil will ever be so healthily represented again. Chelsea have spent in excess of £20 million in trying to find the next crown jewel among Brazil’s young players such as Lucas Piazon, Nathan, Kenedy and Wallace. The first trio have been loaned out on several occasions and have just 15 starts between them (Kenedy 13, Piazon 2, Nathan 0), while Wallace joined Figueirense last year after failing to make a single appearance.

Tim Vickery, a journalist who has covered South American football for the likes of the BBC since 1994, believes the quartet’s struggles may have led to a change of approach. “If that relationship is ending and you’re looking for reasons why, just look at the players Chelsea and England are producing now,” he tells The Athletic. “Maybe there is not the need to import Brazilians if you can have your own. Some of the recent signings from Brazil haven’t really come off. The hype around Piazon in Brazil was unbelievable but where is he now? (On loan at Portuguese club Rio Ave.) People in Brazil thought he was going to be world class. Kenedy is another.

“The way the market has gone if you’re 23 and still in Brazil, you’re considered a bit old for European clubs. They want them by 19-20. But if you buy at that age, it is such a lottery. Recently a French club came over, we don’t know who it was, but they left some notes. One of the things they observed was how poor football in the country has become. They also said the young talent may be good, but Europe is producing players just as good. Maybe that is something which is weakening the relationship — clubs like Chelsea have learnt to use their own.

“I think Willian leaving will be regarded as the end of an era at Chelsea among Brazilians. There is not the same connection anymore. No one else is coming through.”

Having spent seven seasons in west London, Willian has made a significant contribution to the winning of five major honours. However, his demand for a three-year contract has been given short shrift during negotiations and a free transfer elsewhere is now looking a certainty. In terms of who was the most successful Brazilian at Chelsea, Luiz comes out on top with six trophies. But in terms of popularity or who made the biggest impact back home, Ramires emerges as a leading contender.

Ivan Nolasco Jr is the secretary of the Barra Mansa Official Supporters Club, which is the only official one in Brazil recognised by Chelsea. He also runs the Chelsea Fans Brasil website. He states: “If I had to pick one Brazilian who will always be remembered by fans here, it would be Ramires. He was so important in the Champions League campaign in 2012, particularly against Barcelona. He played a big role in winning a trophy we had been chasing for so long.”

Rafael Franca, editor of the Chelsea Brasil website, adds: “The tragic 7-1 defeat against Germany in the 2014 World Cup semi-final ended up undermining Luiz’s reputation here. I would pick two key players: Willian, for his consistency, and Ramires, for his importance in key moments.”

Some of their other countrymen fared less well. For example, striker Alexandre Pato joined on loan from AC Milan in 2016 but made just two appearances, scoring once.

The biggest disappointment of all was also arguably the biggest arrival: 2002 World Cup-winning coach Luiz Felipe Scolari. He took over in the summer of 2008, but was gone by February the following year. What hasn’t been in doubt is the club’s training ground has proved to be a very lively place due to the presence of Brazilians, most notably Luiz and Costa. The latter is still a figure of some renown in Brazil despite defecting to Spain before the 2014 World Cup.

Willian, Ramires and Oscar were friends with them and would socialise, too, despite being regarded more as family men. Indeed, at one point they all lived on the same street near Fulham’s Craven Cottage. That was particularly helpful for wives and partners to also bond in an unfamiliar city.

When it came to organising social gatherings or making practical jokes then Luiz, who was at Chelsea from 2011-14 and 2016-19, was the main ringleader. His top floor apartment in Putney overlooking the River Thames was a regular meeting point. It helped that not only was there a great view over the English capital, but there were also an array of entertainment on offer including arcade games, a pinball machine and pool table.

Such get-togethers helped everyone improve their English as well as still enjoying the taste of food from home. However, despite being a popular figure at the club, Costa never showed any interest in learning English.

As far as Luiz was concerned, anyone was welcome at his home. On one occasion he even invited one of the groundsmen at the club’s training ground, who happened to be Brazilian, back to his place on Christmas Day to celebrate. Luiz and Costa, who was at Chelsea between 2014-17, may have been the biggest characters of all the Brazilian contingent to be purchased, but the stage had been set by right-back Juliano Belletti.

He is most famous back in Brazil for scoring the winning goal to help Barcelona win the 2006 Champions League final, yet his stay at Chelsea between 2007-10 helped raise the club’s profile. “At that time it was rare to see Brazilian players in the Premier League,” Belletti explains to The Athletic. “I was at Barcelona when I found out that Chelsea and Jose Mourinho were interested in me, but even then I knew that it was a big opportunity for me, both on a professional and personal level.

“It was incredible. The club, the fans, the city… they were great times. We went out together as a group sometimes and had family meals at each others’ houses. On rare occasions, we would go to a Brazilian restaurant. There was real friendship between us. The other players were always really interested in Brazilian culture. Music and football especially: they would ask about Brazilian players, the young guys coming through.

“Once, I organised a party for my birthday at my house. We had a Brazilian lunch: barbecue, beans, all the trimmings. Almost all of the players in the squad came. But they didn’t eat much. The next year I made Spanish food and they ate more! Didier Drogba, Florent Malouda, Ricardo Carvalho and Paulo Ferreira were always the most interested when it came to Brazilian music. We had samba on all the time. The best thing was to see the respect and admiration everyone had for Brazil.”

So could the potential absence of Brazilians damage Chelsea’s popularity in that part of the world? A survey conducted back in 2018 estimated that the club were the fifth most supported in Brazil with 320,000 followers — only trailing Barcelona, Real Madrid, Paris Saint-Germain and Bayern Munich.

Joao Castelo-Branco, who is an England-based reporter for ESPN Brasil, doesn’t think the forecast is quite so severe, although agrees the loss of Willian could have an impact. “Will Chelsea keep their Brazilian fans? Definitely,” he insists. “You still see Arsenal with a huge amount of fans in Brazil (from the Invincibles era, which included Gilberto Silva and Edu Gaspar). That was the moment when the Premier League was really getting big over there. They still have a massive following over there

“Chelsea’s wave came straight after that, so the Brazilians who got into watching the Premier League at that point followed them. They also had Scolari, who is a massive character in Brazil, had won the World Cup and then come to Europe, so a lot of people wanted to see how he was doing. A lot of people liked him and wanted him to do well.

“When he came to Chelsea it was huge, because he was the first Brazilian manager in England. We haven’t got a big tradition of Brazilian managers in Europe, so him coming to the Premier League, to a club like Chelsea, was massive.

“Whether they continue to get new ones is a different story — I’d imagine now the younger generation will be looking at Liverpool and Manchester City.”

There aren’t too many signs of pessimism among their backers based in Brazil either. Franca says: “There was a real boom after the Champions League win in 2012. I’m from Rio de Janeiro and it’s quite common to see Chelsea shirts there. The fact that Chelsea had four players in Brazil’s 2014 World Cup squad (Luiz, Willian, Ramires and Oscar) was good for the club’s popularity. But the expansion of Premier League coverage on ESPN Brasil was the real game-changer. Only the Champions League can compete with the Premier League on television here. This has created a real passion for English football.”

Nolasco Jr feels similar, although is watching events with a bit more of a heavy heart. He says: “We’ve seen more and more Chelsea fans in Brazil over the last decade. More games are on television, which has helped that growth. The presence of Brazilian players has helped the Chelsea fanbase grow in Brazil ever since Alex joined. And then we had Ramires, Luiz, Oscar, Willian. They are names that captured the attention of the public, and prompted the broadcasters to show more Chelsea games. It has been really great to watch. It was always great to see Brazilians wearing the blue shirt. Many of them represented our country really well and were missed when they left.

“Willian has been an important player for Chelsea and if he does leave, Brazilians will view that as a real shame. Hopefully we’ll sign another Brazilian soon.”

Chelsea could always dip into the market in future to keep the Brazilian connection alive. There has been speculation for over a year that they are keen on Philippe Coutinho, who is another client of Joorabchian’s, and talk of a loan deal from Barcelona has intensified in recent weeks.

But the days when five were part of a title-winning squad, as they were in 2014-15 (Oscar, Ramires, Costa, Willian and Filipe Luis), are unlikely to ever be repeated.
 

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12 minutes ago, Jason said:

I already posted it (look 4 posts back on this thread)

cheers

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