test

Welcome to Talk Chelsea

Register now to gain access to all of our features. Once registered and logged in, you will be able to contribute to this site by submitting your own content or replying to existing content. You'll be able to customize your profile, receive reputation points as a reward for submitting content, while also communicating with other members via your own private inbox, plus much more! This message will be removed once you have signed in.

DavidEU

Eden Hazard

Started by DavidEU,

25,878 posts in this topic
38 minutes ago, Jason said:

That's one cynical way of looking at it but can you really blame someone for wanting to fulfill their dream - in this case Hazard wanting to play for Real Madrid? 

Who could also predict the future? Who could have predicted that he would suffer two bone injuries from a kick, despite rarely suffering any notable injury while he was here?

No your taking it too far now, I meant in regards to how good he was here, how loved he was, the main man etc. He will never have that in RM. He got his dream move yes, but doesnt mean he will be a big success there.

8 minutes ago, Superblue_1986 said:

Whether he does or not, I think he would have regretted it far more if he hadn't have tried his hand with the move to Madrid.

Probably yes, so far he has produced very little in RM, before he got injured I mean. Lets hope he gets back soon huh.

Johnnyeye likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 minutes ago, Atomiswave said:

No your taking it too far now, I meant in regards to how good he was here, how loved he was, the main man etc. He will never have that in RM. 

You're right but I doubt Hazard bothers about that much. 

11 minutes ago, Atomiswave said:

He got his dream move yes, but doesnt mean he will be a big success there.

Maybe and it's obviously down to him to make his time at Madrid a success but even if it doesn't turn out to be a success, at least he won't retire thinking "what might have been" had we prevented his move or had he not taken the chance to play for them. Must live without regrets, you know. ;)

 

Strike, Fernando, Johnnyeye and 1 other like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, Jason said:

You're right but I doubt Hazard bothers about that much. 

Maybe and it's obviously down to him to make his time at Madrid a success but even if it doesn't turn out to be a success, at least he won't retire thinking "what might have been" had we prevented his move or had he not taken the chance to play for them. Must live without regrets, you know. ;)

 

Agreed my man

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, Fernando said:

I will still take him back in the summer if real Madrid want to sell him back to us. 

knowing those spanish cunts, if it were to happen they would try to include Kante and Alonso in the deal

Atomiswave likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Strike said:

Won't happen but Hazard and Ziyech together would be magic

Real Madrid at times cut their loses fast. 

Let's see if they decide to do that this summer. I think the club should at least inquire if they want to sell back. 🙂

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, Jason said:

No thanks. The Hazard ship has sailed. It's time we move past Hazard and have younger, quality players to take us forward. 

Agreed, we had the best years of his career. He isn't going to get any better. Might hit some purple patches of form and his career will probably last longer playing in Spain than it would in the Premier League.

The key now is to replace Hazard properly in the summer. Ziyech has the potential to be a great buy, and Pulisic and CHO have great potential to be big players in the long term for us but we do need that game changer, the last couple of months have proven that. Doesn't necessarily need to be a wide player either, a talisman striker could be just as good if not better, with the number of attacking midfielders we already have within the squad.

Johnnyeye and Jason like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Superblue_1986 said:

Agreed, we had the best years of his career. He isn't going to get any better. Might hit some purple patches of form and his career will probably last longer playing in Spain than it would in the Premier League.

The key now is to replace Hazard properly in the summer. Ziyech has the potential to be a great buy, and Pulisic and CHO have great potential to be big players in the long term for us but we do need that game changer, the last couple of months have proven that. Doesn't necessarily need to be a wide player either, a talisman striker could be just as good if not better, with the number of attacking midfielders we already have within the squad.

tbh Ziyech and Loftus-Cheek will be that I think plus the likes of Pulisic and Hudson-Odoi will continue to develop. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Former Chelsea player reveals season at new club ‘has been rubbish’

https://www.chelsea-news.co/2020/03/former-chelsea-player-reveals-season-new-club-rubbish/

462363538.jpg

 

There are some players who leave a club and are instantly forgotten, and some who leave a real legacy and a massive hole behind them.

Eden Hazard would be welcomed back at Chelsea in an instant; there is not one fan, coach, or board member who would not bring him back if given the chance.

Chelsea have struggled since he left, they have been without a real game changing player, a player with the ability to score a goal from absolutely nothing, a player to lean on to get them out of trouble when under the cosh. Hazard was that man.

He joined Real Madrid last summer, describing it as his dream move. Naturally, it is the club he supported as a boy.

But things have been far from dreamy during his first season there. He turned up at pre-season over weight, he then suffered injury niggles, and he has really yet to light things up in La Liga.

Hazard has admitted that his first season ‘has been rubbish.’

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Season to adapt? He cost 100m euros and is meant to be one of the best players on the planet. In his best years may I add. What a crock of shite. That excuse might of worked here or somewhere else but at Real Madrid, it is very dangerous saying something like that. Even worse considering how Madrid likely can just go and sign new top top players in the summer if they want to. I mean look how quickly they've thrown Ozil, Di Maria and James Rodriguez aside to get new shiny toys. 

kellzfresh likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Shaun Maloney: De Bruyne and Hazard tick so many boxes but are also so humble

https://theathletic.com/1767669/2020/04/30/shaun-maloney-belgium-de-bruyne-hazard/

Maloney-Belgium-scaled-e1588181032655-1024x683.jpg

“I think the level of player and the things I see in training…” says Belgium assistant coach Shaun Maloney, before pausing for thought. He restarts his answer from another angle. “When you watch these players up close they make you realise… How can I say this?” he says, letting out a sigh which suggests that whichever words he finds to describe what it’s like to train the No 1-ranked national team in the world, they won’t do it justice.

Maloney is a considered talker though as he reflects on 18 months coaching the likes of Kevin De Bruyne and Eden Hazard.

“I knew these players were elite but it’s not until you work with them that you fully understand how many attributes they have at an elite level,” he says. “It’s not just technically, it’s everything. They tick so many boxes but one of the biggest things is how humble they are. The intensity and dedication in training is something that from the beginning — not that it was a surprise — was so high.

“These boys compete at this level every single week so the consistency they show throughout the year is something I’d never seen close up. We could go through every facet of what makes a player, but they have all of them.”

The 37-year-old is back in Scotland when he speaks to The Athletic on FaceTime but being home has become a rarity as he spends most of his time in Belgium or travelling across Europe to meet players in between training camps. Zoom meetings will have to do for this summer after the European Championships were postponed until next year.

It should have been doubly cruel for someone who played 47 times for Scotland, a nation that hasn’t qualified for a major tournament since 1998, but there is no hint of frustration despite the cyclical calendar of international football meaning everything had been geared towards June for the past two years.

“We’re in the midst of something that is far bigger than any sporting event,” he says, almost too simply put.

Maloney retired three years ago after leaving Hull City. It is his first senior coaching job after Brendan Rodgers brought him to Celtic in 2017, where he spent a year coaching players on the fringes of the first-team squad.

He had an impressive career, which included two spells at Celtic, a season at Aston Villa and a four-year stint at Wigan under Roberto Martinez, the man he coaches alongside with Belgium. Maloney has played in the Champions League and assisted an FA Cup-winning final goal for Wigan against Manchester City, so he is well-versed in pressure and big-name players. He has never played alongside world-class players though and, even for the most experienced of coaches, replacing Thierry Henry as the coach to instruct Vincent Kompany could be a daunting prospect.

Maloney Henry

“I was fortunate when I joined that Thierry was still there and stayed for six weeks,” says Maloney, when asked if he had to gain the players’ trust. “I’m quite quiet by nature so that allowed me to come in and find my feet at the start. One of the things I’ve found with every single player in the squad is that they’re very humble. They’re open to talking and discussing anything in the game. That makes me completely at ease to speak to the players. One thing I notice during the tactical meetings is that if anyone has a question then it is always open for them to ask and Roberto will discuss it.

“People talk about different philosophies in the game but there are also different ways to coach. In the last couple of years I’ve definitely realised that telling someone what to do isn’t the right way to go. It has to be a collaboration and you need to have that connection with the player as otherwise it won’t have an effect. I’ve had different types of coaching and that’s the one that worked for me and the one I’ll use throughout my coaching career.”

Maloney suffered chronic injury problems during his second spell at Celtic where he suffered an ACL injury and a serious ankle ligament injury. It was during this fragmented period that he secured his UEFA B Licence and then his UEFA A Licence, but it “didn’t trigger anything inside him”. It was only when he joined Wigan at the age of 28 that his mind really started to focus on the “concepts” he continuously refers to when describing how they train.

“Wigan exposed me to a different style and different understanding of football,” he says. “That curiosity grew until the age of 34 at Hull when I was sure I wanted to become a coach. We had a lot of British players and it was a different idea in terms of training and style of play so it wasn’t something any of us had been accustomed to.

“I played against European teams and national teams where I felt I was in a team that had more effort on the pitch but it felt like we were playing a different game. I didn’t quite understand why that was but there was always an idea that other countries were technically and tactically better than us. That was the general rule. We had a great mentality, great attitude, massive heart in games but there was another side of it. I started to understand that the tactical side of things is arguably more important.”

Scotland are kings of the intangibles and Maloney broke into Martin O’Neill’s Celtic side in 2001, which featured many robust players such as John Hartson and Chris Sutton. He impressed but he often played with a fluency and intricacy which belied his nationality.

Similar to team-mates Lubo Moravcik and Eyal Berkovic, both of whom were similar in style and stature, he had to adapt his game to fit into a league which was very physical. Martinez’s style of football was a natural home for him.

“Roberto’s style of play stuck with me and there was always the curiosity to delve deeper into that, which is the reason we work together,” he says. “As a young coach Brendan was very good to me and both he and Roberto have a connection with players that stands out. I don’t know if you can teach it or not but it’s a special attribute.

“I used to speak to Roberto a lot (at Wigan) and ask him a lot of questions. When I went down to Wigan after a long period of injuries with Celtic I needed a lot of time to recondition so I spent a lot of time with the head of fitness Richard Evans, who is still with Roberto, so I got very close with him. When he went to Everton there were certain messages (to each other) about tactics, games we had watched and games at the World Cup. There was no real idea that come September 2018 he’d ask me to join his staff.”

But the call came and he helps preside over one of the richest talent pools in world football. With that comes demands and it is seen in the way Maloney and Martinez are constantly bouncing ideas off one another. In that, and in so much more, he finds great fulfilment in the role.

Maloney Martinez

“It’s constant. It’s your life but I’m not unhappy with that. I absolutely love watching games, I love working with players on the pitch and seeing players improve or come into the squad. Working on or talking about certain things with a player and then seeing them produce gives you real joy.

“Some of the things you see Eden, Kevin, Dries (Mertens) do in training is incredible. I’ve read a lot recently on Kevin. It’s difficult for me to say any more about him. He’s the complete player. He has everything tactically, technically and, physically, he’s an absolute monster in his speed and agility. What maybe isn’t mentioned as much is his awareness and vision is the work for the team out of possession as that is the same level. He is an incredible team player.

“But there are other things within the game you notice that don’t get spoken about as much. You could literally go right through the squad. (Axel) Witsel’s tactical intelligence in terms of his positioning and how good he is at simple, forward passing. That should never be underrated. Thomas Vermaelen’s performances over the last six to twelve months have been incredible. Our defensive players are at such an elite level so I’m very fortunate to work with these players. That’s part of the reason why I’m so motivated  and I spend so much time travelling to see these players and preparing these ideas with Roberto because the level of these players demands it.

“Roberto wanted the players to get their badges so they could use their experience and intelligence after they retire so he asked most of them to take their UEFA A & B badges, and most have. These players are extremely tactically aware so any messages you have are picked up so quickly. They’re always inquisitive and ask why we’re using a certain concept and asking questions about the opponents.

“It’s maybe an attribute that isn’t really spoken about and it’s something that I notice throughout our group. It’s to do with how they have been brought up through their academies and the clubs they play as they are used to a certain level of tactical information. It’s a different culture to what I was used to.”

In the 43 games since taking over the national team in August 2016, Martinez has lost just three and led Belgium to third at the 2018 World Cup, their best-ever finish.

While there is a school of thought that international management suits pragmatists rather than idealists — which Martinez has been accused of during his time at Wigan at Everton due to perceived defensive frailties — because of the limited time coaches have to work with players, Maloney disagrees and points to the success they have had in playing the same system (variations of 3-4-2-1) since Martinez took over.

“If you watch Belgium play the style of play is exactly what Roberto believes in,” he says. “It has followed him around his career and I don’t think that will ever change. I came in after Roberto had been there for two years so that was two years of working on the style of play but every camp you still work on the principles. Roberto’s philosophy has been honed over the years though.

“In our team you have to have a lot of the ball but the foundation of it is the defensive structure and there are moments you have to suffer without the ball. I don’t think attack and defence are separate discussions. I have been there for nearly two years and I never get the feeling we concentrate on one aspect more than the other. The training is specific for the next opponent. It’s difficult to have an effect on every single point you want to have. It’s trying to prioritise certain tactical ideas and what the issues are for the next game.

“When they come into camp we use all the tools possible. We have a big department of analysts now and can show certain video clips or work with them in smaller groups. We’ve now started using iPads on the pitch but for some players that is not the best way to work so you need to find out which way is best to affect certain players. There is always a way though and you have enough time to get these ideas across. We just need to be as efficient as we can.”

Will the golden generation win silverware next year in what is likely to be their final or penultimate tournament together? It is the final question to be answered by a squad that will enter as one of the favourites. Their world No 1 tag will make sure of it.

“It’s a big thing for the country and the squad. To be ranked No 1 in the world for the last year feels like a big tag for us and, approaching the Euros, it was something we wanted to keep. It has to be the same motivating factor for the next 12 months.

“I don’t really get the sense that winning something is a generational thing as we have had a steady stream of new players come into the squad. It was evident in the game in St Petersburg that when there is a really important match (pivotal in them topping the Euro 2o20 qualification group; they won 4-1) the mindset was ruthless. They understand they have the talent to achieve something great at the Euros.”

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.