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6. Thiago Silva


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i am so smart.

Drogba could do it all. Play on the wing, operate in tight spaces, be an aerial threat, hit long shots. Win free kicks (sneakily) He is the kind of intelligent, not to mention ruthless, player we

Per the interview, it seems more so that he just wasn't interested in playing that style of football and preferred playing in a more technical league but over the last few years (I guess he means duri

No disrespect to Azpilicueta he is a big influence at the club, but he is no captain material if you ask me, Thiago Silva should be given the armband the second he steps a foot at Cobham and he should definitely be the loudest on the pitch, genuine WC defender hopefully his presence will have a similar impact to Van Dijk's arrival at Liverpool. Granted they have better defenders, but still T. Silva's presence alone should be of massive importance.

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Really excited by this signing.

JT had one of the best seasons of his career at 35 and played every single minute of the PL season in 14/15 so let's hope Silva can still have a big impact too. 

At his age he might not be able to play two games a week anymore but he's still a big improvement and most importantly he's an in-game leader that team have been crying out for since JT left. Expecting big things from him, even if relying on him is not a long-term plan. 

With Silva in the squad for the next season or two the club can start planning for a longer term replacement but the CB area should not be an immediate problem anymore.

Really smart contract management by the club too. A one year deal with club option of a second year minimizes risks but if he's still as good as we're hoping him to be the option will surely be used. If not, he will just play a squad role this season and be released next year. At least he can't be worse than what we saw this year.

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24 minutes ago, petre.ispirescu said:

No disrespect to Azpilicueta he is a big influence at the club, but he is no captain material if you ask me, Thiago Silva should be given the armband the second he steps a foot at Cobham and he should definitely be the loudest on the pitch, genuine WC defender hopefully his presence will have a similar impact to Van Dijk's arrival at Liverpool. Granted they have better defenders, but still T. Silva's presence alone should be of massive importance.

Ironic that you said "no disrespect to Azpilicueta" and then proceeded to disrespect him by saying he should be replaced as captain by our latest new shiny toy...

The need for Silva to take the armband is silly and overrated anyway. We had the likes of Terry, Lampard, Drogba, Cech etc all in the past and they didn't even need the armband to lead the team. 

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Welcome to the club. 

It is what we needed short term, thus giving us the options of getting a top CB next season. 

In a team of many youths to have 2 or 3 experiences guys goes a long way. 

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2 hours ago, Jype said:

Really excited by this signing.

JT had one of the best seasons of his career at 35 and played every single minute of the PL season in 14/15 so let's hope Silva can still have a big impact too. 

At his age he might not be able to play two games a week anymore but he's still a big improvement and most importantly he's an in-game leader that team have been crying out for since JT left. Expecting big things from him, even if relying on him is not a long-term plan. 

With Silva in the squad for the next season or two the club can start planning for a longer term replacement but the CB area should not be an immediate problem anymore.

Really smart contract management by the club too. A one year deal with club option of a second year minimizes risks but if he's still as good as we're hoping him to be the option will surely be used. If not, he will just play a squad role this season and be released next year. At least he can't be worse than what we saw this year.

brillant transfer, reminds me of old days when we were signing the likes of Deco, Ballack, Maka, Beletti,...who apparently were too old, but still put a big mark here.

The only part I worry is his decline. Like you said, Terry at 35 was a beast, year later simply not good enough anymore tbh.

Thiago knows the challenge and hopefuly he is ready to go for a season or two more at top level.

Also him agreeing only for 1 year makes me wonder if he agreed to that because he knows he might not be able to keep up with the league for longer.

 

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5 hours ago, Jason said:

Ironic that you said "no disrespect to Azpilicueta" and then proceeded to disrespect him by saying he should be replaced as captain by our latest new shiny toy...

The need for Silva to take the armband is silly and overrated anyway. We had the likes of Terry, Lampard, Drogba, Cech etc all in the past and they didn't even need the armband to lead the team. 

It is not any shiny toy, it is a world class defender with tons of experience that just happened to have played a CL final a week ago. You listed four players that have been strong characters and true leaders in the dressing room and four captains on the pitch, now there is no player with big balls in this squad, at least this is how I see it. It is why I am happy with this transfer, we don't get the prime Thiago Silva, as a matter of fact he's passed it already, but he will bring leadership into a young squad that frankly lacks big characters.

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30 minutes ago, petre.ispirescu said:

It is not any shiny toy, it is a world class defender with tons of experience that just happened to have played a CL final a week ago. You listed four players that have been strong characters and true leaders in the dressing room and four captains on the pitch, now there is no player with big balls in this squad, at least this is how I see it. It is why I am happy with this transfer, we don't get the prime Thiago Silva, as a matter of fact he's passed it already, but he will bring leadership into a young squad that frankly lacks big characters.

No one is really disputing that but giving him the captaincy immediately is kinda ridiculous, especially he has limited English and not fully familiar with the entire dressing room plus still new in the country. Moreover, when you are the captain of a club, you have more responsibility off the field than just on it. 

The point about those 4 players mentioned is that players don't necessarily need the armband to lead.

You mentioned Van Dijk earlier and his impact at Liverpool, he's not even the captain. He's the 2nd vice captain/3rd captain. Can see Thiago being made a vice captain but not the captain. 

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2 hours ago, BlueLyon said:

The only part I worry is his decline. Like you said, Terry at 35 was a beast, year later simply not good enough anymore tbh.

Thiago knows the challenge and hopefuly he is ready to go for a season or two more at top level.

We would certainly have to defend a little deeper and make sure he doesn't get exposed as much as we tend to with our defenders this past season. 

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This transfer reminded me Maldini's interview:

“At times we forget the age of these players, as we have a lot of youngsters. We pushed hard to bring in two more experienced players like Ibra and Simon Kjaer so we could help them to grow. If I didn’t have Franco Baresi and Mauro Tassotti by my side when I was starting out, I wouldn’t have done what I did in my career, because I didn’t feel confident."

https://www.football-italia.net/155770/maldini-milan-cant-win-kids

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If you guys haven't yet, watch the highlights of his last match in the CL final on YouTube. He's just effortlessly classy and extremely calm. Like he's just casually strolling around barely breaking a sweat. And that's against the scariest side in Europe who have blown everyone else away.

That's precisely what we needed. Shit, depending on the CB partnership and the keeper situation it could mean Jorginho comes back in the fold as a hugely important player. Having a rock of a defender behind him so we aren't totally exposed to counter attacks could allow us to use J5.

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tbh this dude is example how funny people look when they constantly say stuff like ohh Koulibaly or xyz is soon 30 etc...

If we signed Thiago when he was 29, he would deliver at least 5 seasons at the top level. Same with Ramos. 

Ballack and Maka were also "old" when we signed them.

 

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Captain, leader, scapegoat: Silva arrives at Chelsea with a point to prove

https://theathletic.com/2021586/2020/08/28/thiago-silva-chelsea-move-contract/

silva-psg-scaled-e1598377646406-1024x691.jpg

Thiago Silva has always been a curious jumble of contradictions.

He is a hardman centre-back — a Big Sheriff, to use the endearing Brazilian term — who often plays football as if he is on the verge of tears. He has won 28 trophies but continues to be haunted by a nagging feeling of underachievement. He is, in the words of Brazil manager Tite, a “natural-born leader”, yet his critics will tell you that he goes missing when push comes to shove.

It has been especially hard to get a real grip on him in England. We have viewed him principally through two prisms: as a foundational stone of the Paris Saint-Germain project, with all its failures and flightiness, and as a mainstay of the Brazil side during one of the most miserable periods in its entire history.

Guilty by association? That might be pushing it, but it is probably fair to say that any evaluation based solely upon Champions League nights and World Cups does him no great favours.

Now, aged 35, Silva comes to England. This is not some lifetime ambition fulfilled — he has made it very clear that he wanted to stay in Paris — but it does present him with a series of opportunities: to help guide a young, exciting team; to keep himself in the Brazil conversation until World Cup 2022; to prove, after eight seasons in France, that he could have cut it in any of Europe’s top leagues.

And, of course, that PSG were wrong to let him go.


From a technical and physical perspective, Silva’s quality has never been in doubt. Since his early years at Juventude and Fluminense, where he earnt the nickname O Monstro, he has been the kind of dominant, assured defender around which managers love to build sides. At AC Milan, he shone alongside Alessandro Nesta and was named as the successor to Franco Baresi — by the legendary defender himself.

“It’s difficult to identify where he can still improve,” said Baresi. “He has already proven that he has everything.”

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It is natural to wonder whether the Baresi prophecy would have been borne out had Silva remained in Italy. But this, in hindsight, was probably the peak of his career, at least in terms of his global reputation. The move to PSG in 2012 made him one of the best-paid players in the world, but it also made his legacy contingent on success in Europe. Silva is a PSG icon by any metric, having captained the side to seven of their nine Ligue 1 titles. But he is also, unavoidably, a symbol of their inability to win the Champions League.

A victim of it, too, in some ways. If you were to bullet point the 10 biggest issues with PSG’s efforts in Europe over the last eight years, Silva wouldn’t be among them. Yet a few individual mistakes do stick in the mind — that brainless handball against Chelsea in 2015, for instance — and there have been persistent whispers about his ability to keep a level head when the pressure is ramped up.

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Silva’s handball against Chelsea (Photo: Paul Gilham/Getty Images)

Case in point: the era-defining 6-1 surrender to Barcelona in 2017. Unai Emery is not everyone’s idea of a good manager, but his assessment of Silva’s role in that defeat was quietly damning.

“I wanted the team to defend higher,” Emery told France Football. “Thiago Silva is a great player, but I wanted him to be higher and I couldn’t get him to accept that. I wanted him to get out of his comfort zone, to dare to defend higher so that our pressure on the opponent would be more effective. I worked with him to get him to accept this, but I was unsuccessful. And this characteristic of Thiago Silva’s game echoed throughout the team, which under pressure had a natural tendency to back down.”

That will ring a bell with anyone who watched him closely during the 2014 World Cup. Nearly all of Brazil’s players appeared to struggle with the responsibility of winning the thing on home soil, but Silva looked utterly overwhelmed. He welled up during every national anthem. When the round-of-16 game against Chile went to penalties, he refused to take the sixth kick and asked to go last, after goalkeeper Julio Cesar. Silva could not even bring himself to watch the shootout. When Brazil won it, he cried his eyes out.

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Silva, second from left, cannot bear to watch Brazil’s penalty shootout against Chile in 2014 (Photo: Jean Catuffe/Getty Images)

Those histrionics chimed with a wider sense of fragility within the squad — later exposed by Germany — and drew criticism from former players and journalists. “The players have to stop crying and focus on playing football,” said 2002 World Cup winner Cafu. “The players are emotionally unstable,” wrote Estado de Minas columnist Antero Greco, presumably with Silva in mind. “They’re crybabies. They have too many tears and not enough smiles. It affects them technically and tactically.”

Silva had the good fortune to miss the 7-1 defeat by Germany. But even that came with an addition to his rap sheet: he was suspended after picking up an unnecessary yellow card against Colombia in the previous game. He was stripped of the captaincy in the wake of the World Cup (“I can’t pretend I’m happy. It’s a sad, painful moment, as if they took something away from me”) and worse was to come: he was made a scapegoat for Brazil’s 2015 Copa America exit after giving away a daft late penalty (another handball) against Paraguay. He did not play for his country again for 17 months.

Two points are worth making here. The first is that these were Brazil’s car-crash years, a mess of bad decisions and abject leadership from which no one truly emerged unscathed. Neymar, Marcelo, Fernandinho, Filipe Luis, Miranda, Marquinhos… these are players who deserved much better. Silva’s name can be added to that list, and it is telling that his performances picked up markedly when Tite — a coach who actually belongs in this century — took over from Dunga in 2016. Silva has arguably never been more impressive for the Selecao than he was at the Copa America last year.

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(Photo: Juan Mabromata/AFP via Getty Images)

The second is that Silva’s entire career has been built on a quiet determination that can evade a fleeting glance. His emotions may lurk close to the surface, but he is certainly not weak. This, after all, is someone who fought his way back from tuberculosis before establishing himself at Fluminense between 2006 and 2009. The diagnosis came shortly after he joined Dinamo Moscow as a 20-year-old in 2005. He spent six months in a Russian hospital bed and put on 10kg; doctors said he would be lucky to play again.

That he came back at all is impressive; that he was widely regarded as one of the best defenders in the world just five years later is remarkable. It was a formative experience and then some; it shaped his personality, made him grow up. “After my illness, I felt stronger, more responsible,” he told Placar magazine in 2014. “Before that, I was just a kid who liked playing football.”

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Silva celebrates for Fluminense (Photo: Juan Mabromata/AFP via Getty Images)

It made him a model professional and a role model. “It has been a pleasure to have a captain with his personality,” Thomas Tuchel said this weekend, and his absence will be felt by the PSG players, too. The example of Marquinhos, who has learnt at his side and is now ready to take on his mantle at the Parc des Princes, is instructive; he calls Silva “an idol” and will forever be indebted to him. Chelsea’s young centre-backs will surely be hoping to tap into his knowhow too.

For Brazil, he has settled into the role of elder statesman, setting the standards for the next generation to follow. “Thiago is a leader on and off the pitch,” says Gremio centre-back Pedro Geromel, who was part of Tite’s 2018 World Cup squad with Silva. “I can tell you that he’s a very intelligent person. He was always talking to me, giving me instructions in training, but he is also modest enough to listen to advice. He pushes himself to the limit and always wants to improve. He’s a true professional, really committed. He didn’t start a Champions League final at the age of 35 by chance.”

Silva has ambitions to go into coaching when he retires, but he does not see this move as the start of that transition. He dreams of ending his career after Qatar 2022 and, perhaps because he only started playing for Milan at 24, still feels that he has plenty of gas left in the tank. He is coming to Stamford Bridge to make a difference and set an example, not to sit on the bench and pick up a wage.

“My physique is not that of a 35-year-old athlete,” he told France Football in November. “I’m paying more and more attention to my body. By being professional and demanding in every area, I hope that I will be able to extend my career. I feel like I’m in my best years.”

If he is right, and Frank Lampard can find a way to harness his experience, he might just put some overdue shine on his legacy at the very last.

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3 hours ago, BlueLyon said:

tbh this dude is example how funny people look when they constantly say stuff like ohh Koulibaly or xyz is soon 30 etc...

If we signed Thiago when he was 29, he would deliver at least 5 seasons at the top level. Same with Ramos. 

Ballack and Maka were also "old" when we signed them.

 

3 points

1. you are using genetic freaks for examples (I can make a list but I will spare us all), the vast majority of players are shit by 32, 33yo in terms of top 10 teams on the planet play. Iwill grant that there are 4 positions who age better. Strikers, SOME CB's, Pirlo (another genetic freak btw) type deep-lying registas, and obviously GKers.

Trad DMF's, most all wingers, most other types of MFers, and almost all fullbacks are done far sooner

2. we did not have FFP to deal with in the noughties, so 'dead money' buys were ok

3. Silva was a free transfer, Koulibaly will still cost damn near £70m or so, I would wager, and he showed slippage last season

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