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Sepp Blatter and FIFA Corruption


Pot Noodle
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This is the year 2015 and we as a species still aren't fucking past actually knowing what 'racism' is.

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If UEFA leaves FIFA does that mean we will have Euros every 2 years?

I'd actually be okay with that.

Should just have a world cup every 2 years and take out euros..

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948bfc6ec5e8b2ea1524f604297c3122.jpg

Sums it up perfectly. A country wins the rights despite having no football grounds and where the weather is able to hit 120 degrees yet they still fucking won. F.I.F.A has got blood on it's hands and the despot Blatter has been running F.I.F.A as his own personal fiefdom.

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It seems like it has become a fashionable "in thing" to hate on Blatter and vote against them. I like this man's aims for world football, he clearly has an ambitious aim to make all nations equal. This man has pumped money into African/Asian countries to get them to par with European/South American sides. I can only respect his efforts. Since Blatter has stepped in, the performance of Asian/African has drastically improved in World cups. While these western European nations may have this view of Blatter, it is far from what other nations in the world think of him.

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It seems like it has become a fashionable "in thing" to hate on Blatter and vote against them. I like this man's aims for world football, he clearly has an ambitious aim to make all nations equal. This man has pumped money into African/Asian countries to get them to par with European/South American sides. I can only respect his efforts. Since Blatter has stepped in, the performance of Asian/African has drastically improved in World cups. While these western European nations may have this view of Blatter, it is far from what other nations in the world think of him.

It's not exactly Altruism at it's finest is it. He gave all the money to the African nations to secure votes. It's hardly a fashionable '' in thing'' to question someone's motives especially when the F.B.I. arrest half of your underlings. It reminds me of the lyric from White Riot by The Clash (R.I.P. Joe Strummer Chelsea fan) '' All the power is in the hands of people rich enough to buy it''.

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It seems like it has become a fashionable "in thing" to hate on Blatter and vote against them. I like this man's aims for world football, he clearly has an ambitious aim to make all nations equal. This man has pumped money into African/Asian countries to get them to par with European/South American sides. I can only respect his efforts. Since Blatter has stepped in, the performance of Asian/African has drastically improved in World cups. While these western European nations may have this view of Blatter, it is far from what other nations in the world think of him.

And the same could have been achieved without bribery and corruption

Blaster is a cancer on football - he needs to be eradicated...

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how or who, is better to say, found money for organize the application of Russia?

Russia has 108 billionaires and you make a baseless assumption that it's our billionaire.

I'm going to start calling you KEVIN WOODFURNACE

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how or who, is better to say, found money for organize the application of Russia?

Well fair enough mate just say it Roman ha ha. Yes you could well have a point there.

Vladimir Putin tells Roman Abramovich to pay for World Cup 2018
Chelsea's owner is expected to invest heavily and take a key role as Russia hosts football World Cup
Roman-Abramovich-in-Zuric-006.jpg Roman Abramovich, left, with other members of the Russian delegation in Zurich last week. Photograph: Anthony Devlin/PA

Tom Parfitt in Moscow

Sunday 5 December 2010 00.07 GMT Last modified on Tuesday 3 June 201415.20 BST

Roman Abramovich, the billionaire owner of Chelsea football club, is to take a leading role in preparations for World Cup 2018 after Russian prime minister Vladimir Putin indicated he should "open his wallet" and help pay for the championship.

Abramovich, who already bankrolls the Russian national team, was a prominent member of Moscow's delegation to Zurich, where Fifa last week awarded Russiathe right to host the competition.

While he usually shuns publicity, the tycoon could be seen grinning and embracing other members of the delegation, including Arsenal and Russia midfielder Andrei Arshavin.

Abramovich, 44, is expected to stump up millions of dollars as the country embarks on a £2.4bn plan to build 13 new stadia and renovate three existing ones. A further £7bn is needed to improve tourism infrastructure, in particular to build affordable hotels for fans.

Putin said after Russia's win that Abramovich could ease government spending on construction for the World Cup by investing privately. "I don't rule out that Mr Abramovich may take part in one of these projects," Putin said in televised comments. "Let him open his wallet a little. It's no big deal – he won't feel the pinch. He has plenty of money."

John Mann, a spokesman for Abramovich's holding company, Millhouse Capital, confirmed the businessman was willing to contribute "in partnership with the state". Last month Forbes magazine rated Abramovich as the 50th-richest man in the world, with an estimated personal fortune of £7bn. As the tycoon's wealth recovers from a bruising during the global financial crisis, the stage now seems set for his apotheosis as the saviour of Russian football.

Russia's oligarchs are finely tuned to Kremlin intimations that they should support patriotic national projects: analysts say they are keen to avoid the fate of oil tycoon Mikhail Khodorkovsky, who has spent seven years in jail on charges of fraud, and is due to be sentenced in a second trial this month. The charges against Khodorkovsky are widely perceived as being trumped up in revenge for him supporting Russia's beleaguered political opposition.¬

Putin showed off his imperious treatment of big business in June when he threw a pen at billionaire metals magnate, Oleg Deripaska, and ordered him to sign a contract to save an ailing factory.

After the roller coaster 1990s, when Abramovich built up his business empire through a series of opaque auctions of state-owned oil fields, he appeared to have inoculated himself from Kremlin criticism by becoming governor of the remote Arctic region of Chukotka, where he invested huge tranches of his own money.

But he provoked anger when he bought Chelsea in 2003, leading critics to say he was neglecting his homeland, where many football clubs struggle with ageing facilities. Putin hinted on Thursday that the tycoon had still to fully atone for the purchase. "Mr Abramovich worked for several years as the governor of Chukotka," he said. "He didn't do too badly. Not many people know him from that point of view. Mostly they say he's the oligarch who bought Chelsea football club. In Russia, that's met with both positive and negative emotions."

Abramovich, meanwhile, claims he is simply a fan of the game. In the past his Sibneft oil company sponsored the former army club, CSKA. And in 2004 he established a national football academy that has built 70 artificial surface pitches for schools across the country. The academy also paid for new training facilities for the national team, and forked out about £1.6m annually for former manager Guus Hiddink and his staff.

Russian media reported yesterday that Abramovich was to invest more than £500m to build a new stadium on the edge of Moscow. The 44,275-capacity arena would be the "best equipped" in the world, they said. Mann denied the claim, but hinted that other plans were already in the pipeline.

Several other Russian investors are expected to finance construction for the World Cup. Lukoil, the country's largest oil company, is building a stadium for Spartak Moscow, BTB bank for Lokomotiv, and the Gazprom energy giant for Zenit in St Petersburg.

Euphoria at winning the right to host the World Cup continued in Moscow this weekend. Many Russians had perceived an unjust campaign against their country in the British media, and were jubilant that it backfired and possibly hurt England's chances.

Alexei Sorokin, chief executive of Russia's bid, told the Sovetsky Sport newspaper yesterday that the English delegation was the only one to snub the winners after victory. "Gentlemen should know how to lose," he said.

In a separate interview, Sorokin saidthat Prince William had offered "polite and laconic" congratulations

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Iggy Doonican

you did it



Russia has 108 billionaires and you make a baseless assumption that it's our billionaire.

I'm going to start calling you KEVIN WOODFURNACE

i live in that territories my bro.

and keep going to call me acording my profile :)

Kevin is unique


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