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Jason

closed Chelsea 0-2 Man Utd

Started by Jason,

Man of the Match   11 members have voted

  1. 1. Who is your Man of the Match?

    • Kepa
      0
    • Azpilicueta
      0
    • Rudiger
      0
    • Luiz
      0
    • Alonso
      2
    • Jorginho
      0
    • Kante
      1
    • Kovacic
      0
    • Hazard
      7
    • Pedro
      0
    • Higuain
      1
    • Willian (sub)
      0
    • Barkley (sub)
      0
    • Zappacosta (sub)
      0

Please sign in or register to vote in this poll.

489 posts in this topic
1 hour ago, Unionjack said:

OK I'll accept HE is maybe out of his depth but you can't tell me Zola is just sitting there telling himn hes doing a good job.

He cant have said 'Boss we need to bring Zappa on for Dave - he will give us goals;

according to italian comment of the match, azpi had a muscolar trouble 

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16 minutes ago, Fulham Broadway said:

Zola wasn't there last night, got the flu.

Feel a bit sorry for the fag chewer. I genuinely think he doesn't know what he's doing - He turned up thinking his shape and style would work and he's genuinely perplexed that it isn't - The problem is he'll keep trying even if it means we end up in League 2.

Time to get rid, the players are still playing for him, just not well - That's almost worse (and by the way, we need to get rid of a lot of those cunts in the summer too).

Couldn't see from where I was.

But you get my point tho

I know its boring me keep saying it but its time for a massive clear out, From top to bottom.

 

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I agree.

What do you do when you need to do get rid of the gut's ache and and need to get the shit out.

Have a good clear out:blink:

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Sarri in or Sarri out, it doesn't matter anymore. I give up on him. Pity is that manager like Conte is just what board like ours needed. Only thing incompatible with Conte was his mouth.

Manager like Sarri is for a well run club, with clear structure, with decent founds and with different players. His football needs everything set-up well, not like it is with us. He is not adaptable.

We and him are match made in hell.

I miss Conte and almost shed a tear reading your post. I know his last half a season was a disaster, but you never lost the feeling that a motivated Conte was a winner. He lost hope with the board and loss of hope breaks a man's spirit, like it has broken ours time and time again. The drive and passion he had before he got fucked... I mean he's a winner and a passionate man, but all he encountered were clueless business people running a company not a football club.

 

All our managers have found working with this board is impossible. I have superficial hope, but deep down I know nothing will change. It's been years, I was still in high school when this slow but consistent decline began with warning signs everywhere chosen to be ignored. We've been absolutely shitting on the board on this forum for as long as I can remember, sick and tired tbh.

 

I want the club sold.

 

Sent from my Mi A1 using Tapatalk

 

 

 

Unionjack, El P., Johnnyeye and 1 other like this

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7 minutes ago, manpe said:

I miss Conte and almost shed a tear reading your post. I know his last half a season was a disaster, but you never lost the feeling that a motivated Conte was a winner. He lost hope with the board and loss of hope breaks a man's spirit, like it has broken ours time and time again. The drive and passion he had before he got fucked... I mean he's a winner and a passionate man, but all he encountered were clueless business people running a company not a football club.

 

All our managers have found working with this board is impossible. I have superficial hope, but deep down I know nothing will change. It's been years, I was still in high school when this slow but consistent decline began with warning signs everywhere chosen to be ignored. We've been absolutely shitting on the board on this forum for as long as I can remember, sick and tired tbh.

 

I want the club sold.

 

Sent from my Mi A1 using Tapatalk

If only time travel exists...would gladly go back to 2004 and take Mourinho 1.0!

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4 hours ago, Jason said:

If only time travel exists...would gladly go back to 2004 and take Mourinho 1.0!

If we could morph Mou mkI / Conte year 1, a splash of Ancelotti and a touch of Sarri we would have the makings of what we need.

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22 minutes ago, Unionjack said:

If we could morph Mou mkI / Conte year 1, a splash of Ancelotti and a touch of Sarri we would have the makings of what we need.

The Masterminds

THE INCOMPARABLE LEGACY OF HELENIO HERRERA

herrera.jpg

‘He who plays for himself plays for the opposition. He who plays for the team, plays for himself. He who doesn’t give it all, gives nothing’

http://thesefootballtimes.co/2015/12/17/the-incomparable-legacy-of-helenio-herrera/

Helenio Herrera was one of the most original managers football has seen, in most ways imaginable. He ruled his teams with a combination of dictatorial discipline, gruesome training regimes, bizarre psychological habits, military-style training camps, and strict dietary plans. Nobody possessed a fiercer will to win – and nobody went further in order to achieve it.

His methods could be cruel and heartless, his teams ruthless and cynical. Throughout his two most successful spells, with Barcelona from 1958 to 1960, and with Internazionale from 1960 to 1968, his eccentric persona infiltrated the press. The colourful phrases and affronts attributed to him – correctly or not – merited their own dictionary. An egocentric, he revelled in the attention.

When he published his memoirs, according to Sid Lowe’s book Fear and Loathing in La Liga (2013), the blurb read: “This Herrera is the devil! Now he’s writing memoirs! May God forgive us! As if he hasn’t made enough noise already! As if the papers don’t dedicate him enough attention already! As if his words weren’t already invading every home, every office, every workshop and every public space! As if he wasn’t admired enough already! As if he wasn’t hated enough already!”

Herrera claimed to have invented several aspects of modern football. Some assertions were false, but most were not. They include training camps and the allegedly destructive catenaccio system synonymous with Italian defensive football. He was the first modern manager. He elevated the coach from a peripheral figure to one of fame, power and influence. He was the first tactician to take credit for victories, and to command salaries in a similar bracket to his star players. He applied shrewd motivational techniques, and monitored his players’ private lives.

Critics often felt he went too far in pursuit of victory. More than once, these included his own players. “I’ve been accused of being tyrannical and completely ruthless with my players,” he said, according to Jonathan Wilson’s book Inverting the Pyramid: The History of Football Tactics (2008). “But I merely implemented things that were later copied by every single club: hard work, perfectionism, physical training, diets, and three days of concentration before every game.”

The demands of abstention were modelled on Herrera’s own private life. He never smoked and rarely drank. According to his daughter, Luna, his pasta dishes contained only olive oil and parmesan. He did yoga every morning. When awaking, he would tell himself: “I am strong, calm, I fear nothing, I am beautiful.” He was even wary of drinking too much water, hiding the bottle on the floor and guarding it with his feet when dining with his children.

A relentless notion of discipline drove a fervent personality that could have no credible imitator. “Go ahead and judge him as the mood takes you,” Gianni Brera, the influential Italian football columnist, wrote in 1966. “Clown and genius, buffoon and ascetic, rogue and model father, sultan and faithful husband, swaggering fool and quiet achiever, delinquent and competent, megalomaniac and health fanatic. Herrera is all of the above and more.”

 

SNIP

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