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DavidEU

19. Diego Costa

Started by DavidEU,

8,687 posts in this topic

I will never know why he changes titles and days like yesterday for a few more quids in China. Especially if you consider that he has a few years at the highest level left..

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1 hour ago, Beigl said:

I will never know why he changes titles and days like yesterday for a few more quids in China. Especially if you consider that he has a few years at the highest level left..

Imagine a coworker, inferior in your skill set, moved to a new company and got paid an obscene amount of money. You would want that too right? Especially when you only had 10 years, at best, to make a living for yourself and family?

 

The money is too much. He would do what most would do if given the choice coming from poverty.

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Another dreadful perfomance last night. Hope Conte replaces him with Michy for the last two league matches and is departure is sooner rather than later.

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Diego is not, in fact I'd say almost no footballers in any top team, come from poverty....

Even unknown (to us) gems in Brazil get £250 a week/£10k per year, at 17 years old, in a country where utilities for the month cost less than 1 meal at a mid-range eatery in London.
They're a 2nd-world country, Brazil, not 3rd. 

Costa, Oscar, Neymar all these Brazilians, it's insulting to them AND to us to push that lie. You are not from poverty if you've been a self made millionaire since 19. Your parents might be, but you are not. You have not suffered through the entirety of your developmental years eating out of bins. You've had 5 years you barely remember since birth, 10 tough years, oh boo hoo, and then made the transition into the top 10% of earners on earth.

He'd only move if he's an idiot, or genuinely wants to see China. As if any footballer on the face of this earth even knows how to spend their current weekly wage, nevermind a pay rise. The money doesn't attract them, the status does. And status is nothing to do with poverty; it's to do with mindset and who you believed you were growing up. So in essence, it's about ego, and proving to yourself you're worthy of the prize being offered.

Footballers are more complicated than banks. And if they've been millionaires or hundred-thousandaires before the age of 20, they don't know the meaning of poverty at all. People go through poverty don't make it out the other side. They don't get the chance to play in front of scouts or go to training sessions. That isn't poverty. With the amount of muscle these guys have by the age of 20, it's not like they're eating egg cartons.

We haven't seen a Brazilian player that comes from real poverty.

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26 minutes ago, Sir Mikel OBE said:

Imagine a coworker, inferior in your skill set, moved to a new company and got paid an obscene amount of money. You would want that too right? Especially when you only had 10 years, at best, to make a living for yourself and family?

 

The money is too much. He would do what most would do if given the choice coming from poverty.

True but some people also learn not to chase the money. If your happy where you at and make enough money then stay. 

Again very few people realize that. 

We shall see if he consider this, because it's not like he's going poor here. 

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1 hour ago, Sir Mikel OBE said:

Imagine a coworker, inferior in your skill set, moved to a new company and got paid an obscene amount of money. You would want that too right? Especially when you only had 10 years, at best, to make a living for yourself and family?

 

The money is too much. He would do what most would do if given the choice coming from poverty.

Fair enough, but I think he still can go to China in say 4-5 years as he is just 28 years old. Until then he can still win so many important titles. 

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7 hours ago, Leif said:

Diego is not, in fact I'd say almost no footballers in any top team, come from poverty....

Even unknown (to us) gems in Brazil get £250 a week/£10k per year, at 17 years old, in a country where utilities for the month cost less than 1 meal at a mid-range eatery in London.
They're a 2nd-world country, Brazil, not 3rd. 

Costa, Oscar, Neymar all these Brazilians, it's insulting to them AND to us to push that lie. You are not from poverty if you've been a self made millionaire since 19. Your parents might be, but you are not. You have not suffered through the entirety of your developmental years eating out of bins. You've had 5 years you barely remember since birth, 10 tough years, oh boo hoo, and then made the transition into the top 10% of earners on earth.

He'd only move if he's an idiot, or genuinely wants to see China. As if any footballer on the face of this earth even knows how to spend their current weekly wage, nevermind a pay rise. The money doesn't attract them, the status does. And status is nothing to do with poverty; it's to do with mindset and who you believed you were growing up. So in essence, it's about ego, and proving to yourself you're worthy of the prize being offered.

Footballers are more complicated than banks. And if they've been millionaires or hundred-thousandaires before the age of 20, they don't know the meaning of poverty at all. People go through poverty don't make it out the other side. They don't get the chance to play in front of scouts or go to training sessions. That isn't poverty. With the amount of muscle these guys have by the age of 20, it's not like they're eating egg cartons.

We haven't seen a Brazilian player that comes from real poverty.

19 year olds don't know their ass from a hole in the ground as we say in America. Just because a poor kid worked to get to a point where they are in a career at 19 does not mean they are not from poverty. Costa grew up in the middle of nowhere in a place that is not exactly rich, then went to work in a store as a young teen. Not publi- funded schools, but a store. To say he's not from poverty is absolutely silly.

Coming from 100 pound a month to the money China is offering it would be mad, of him, not to take it. People don't understand what poverty is. Brazil may be a "Second world" country but people from Costa's station in life for damn sure aren't seeing the difference between that and the poorest of poor nations.

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41 minutes ago, lucashm said:

I am brazilian, and trust me, you have no idea what you are talking about, Diego is from the state of Bahia, which is located at the poorest region of the country, you would be shocked to see the situation of most people on that place.

Most footballers from here come from a background of extreme poverty, and i mean like, not knowing where your next meal is gonna come from, those people view football, as a way to escape that situation, sometimes, the only way. Thats why most kids in here dream of being football payers, so they can escape the terrible future that awaits them.

Unfortunately thats the situation of this country.

People don't understand.  It isnt even about being from Bahia either, which costa isnt, There are nice(relatively) places in Bahia and the north east. Its the fact that Costa is from somewhere that is POOR poor. Even by South America standards.

 

I've not been exactly to Costa's hometown, but I have been to the capital of his region and surrounding areas, and its POOR. This isnt Sao Paulo by any stretch of the imagination. I've had my heart broken in Aracaju. Seeing starving kids on the street balling and crying for food and shelter. Anybody who could judge Costa negatively for trying to cash in coming from this needs to take a long hard look in the mirror. This is a job, and the state entitlements and safety nets you have in Europe doesnt exist for the rest of the world.

 

 

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1 hour ago, lucashm said:

I am brazilian, and trust me, you have no idea what you are talking about, Diego is from the state of Bahia, which is located at the poorest region of the country, you would be shocked to see the situation of most people on that place.

Most footballers from here come from a background of extreme poverty, and i mean like, not knowing where your next meal is gonna come from, those people view football, as a way to escape that situation, sometimes, the only way. Thats why most kids in here dream of being football payers, so they can escape the terrible future that awaits them.

Unfortunately thats the situation of this country.

I hear you, but I feel Brasilians are limited by their choice to not use creativity / need to follow the 'system' instead of thinking outside of the box, more than they're limited by 'poverty' which an incredible amount seem to be surviving through, I mean look at the country's population.
If a few people think this is good/this is bad, generally everyone joins in and agrees. If this is how a Brasilian lives life, this is how a Brasilian lives life. 
Colombia have a poverty % of 20%+, but we don't need reminders that yes, a lot of people go through hardships growing up. There's not that exuding victim mentality.

Tin roofs vs brick roofs, 3 Brazil nuts vs 3 course meals, family friends vs. business assosciates - we're the same. We have the same. We both have shelter. We're as likely to suffer from health issues as eachother (obesity vs. malnutrition; inactivity vs lack of health education.) And we both have connections. It's about how you use them. Many people have created great lives for themselves with less than a shoe string to start with.

Opportunities have always been created the same way, in every country, and even people in desert huts can figure this method out - give positive energy to people not out of your reach, but better positioned than yourself; think as creatively as you can; and learn how to build relationships. Why aren't the people embracing that in Brazil? Why is it "I can't get hired, so i can't get money" instead of "I'll spend whatever time I can get on the internet learning about businesses and opportunities in Bahia"? (even people in poverty have the means to reach a digital screen for 20mins a day, if they desire). Too many people aren't taking responsibility for themselves, and that's why the country keeps shooting itself in the foot. The public are even completely apathetic to the corruption in politics; just accepting that 'this is the Brazil way, things will figure themselves out'. The mentality prevents progression, not lack of the essentials.


A dad who runs his home in a favela leaves poverty the day he decides to quit living each week the same as the last, and instead, train his kid, and find football agents or those who know them. Even in just trying, good will come - perhaps one of the family become a coach, or inspired to paint footballers - anything. He'll become rich in opportunity. But that step into the unknown is rarely ever taken by Brasilians in the "lowest" financial bracket, because there's no belief that trying something different might actually work. There's a mentality from the go that helplessness should be the default. It's an inferiority complex and it's entirely fictional, but everyone's bought into it. 

Brazil is rich in resources, and not every inch of land is owned privately. There is opportunity everywhere, for everyone, from a kid who teaches himself to be a comedian, to a dancer whose family help set up a stage on the beach to impress with his body for money, to private tutoring in whatever skill a person can teach themselves, simply charging a middle class person "above" them a really fair rate. It wouldn't be true to say that the 'lower' and 'middle' class simply don't talk or mingle. There's dialogue there to be had. And it's up to the 'lower' class to build those bridges instead of having a pack mentality.

They only lack because they don't see, and what they don't see is how much power & freedom every single person East of Turkey has.
 

You suffer from poverty if you can't remember your last drink, can't remember the last time you saw a smile, can't remember the last time you heard a different story or saw a different view in front of you. You suffer from poverty if there are no food carts around to steal from. You suffer from poverty if you have no protection from nature's elements.
I don't think the majority of Brasilian 'poverty' sufferers tick even 2 of those boxes. They all have very, very rich lives compared to a lot people. In fact, they already have what every depressed millionaire is seeking, we already know that. The only difference the millionaire would make would be more food & a fancier home. The dream life is sharing love and laughter with family, friends; hearing your football team's supporters scream as they've scored in the stadium just 0.5miles away. It's having good weather, genuine connections, and the ability to think for yourself, choose for yourself, and live for & by yourself, if you desire. Every kid in the favela has that. All of that. And I tell you, living inside brick walls in a country with 0 sun is as mentally & physically damaging as living under tin in a country where the sun doesn't go down.

You're in poverty if you're worse off. I have personal friends who'd trade their British lives for Brasilian poverty. They'd still a watermelon every week, but other than that life would be calm, and beautiful, because they'd be coming with a different perspective, where luxury is a homemade hammock with a view.

 

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8 hours ago, Sir Mikel OBE said:

Imagine a coworker, inferior in your skill set, moved to a new company and got paid an obscene amount of money. You would want that too right? Especially when you only had 10 years, at best, to make a living for yourself and family?

 

The money is too much. He would do what most would do if given the choice coming from poverty.

Competitive sports and office jobs are two different worlds.

Vince Lombardi:" I firmly believe that any man's finest hour, the greatest fulfillment of all that he holds dear, is that moment when he has worked his heart out in a good cause and lies exhausted on the field of battle – victorious.”

Good luck to anyone who leaves us for money. We'll experience moments that money can't buy.

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15 hours ago, 11Drogba said:

Competitive sports and office jobs are two different worlds.

Vince Lombardi:" I firmly believe that any man's finest hour, the greatest fulfillment of all that he holds dear, is that moment when he has worked his heart out in a good cause and lies exhausted on the field of battle – victorious.”

Good luck to anyone who leaves us for money. We'll experience moments that money can't buy.

 The first line is true. A man can do an office job for 30, or even 40 years.Costa's career will be done, for the most part, in a decade. That makes making the most money possible quickly even more important.

 

Also that Vince Lombardi quote rings hollow when he coached for decades, and the average American football player only has a career that spans ~3-4 years, and in a sport so dangerous many don't even get guaranteed contracts.

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10 hours ago, Sir Mikel OBE said:

 The first line is true. A man can do an office job for 30, or even 40 years.Costa's career will be done, for the most part, in a decade. That makes making the most money possible quickly even more important.

 

Also that Vince Lombardi quote rings hollow when he coached for decades, and the average American football player only has a career that spans ~3-4 years, and in a sport so dangerous many don't even get guaranteed contracts.

An accountant might work for 40 years and could still end up in debt. Chelsea players grandchildren's children will not worry about money.

So you are saying Drogba and Lampard should have left when they were 28 if they received a bigger salary offer from Qatar or China. I am pretty sure they would not exchange any salary increase to a CL win. Players who win the biggest trophies, they get both money and personal satisfaction. After they win the trophies, they can always go to China or US like Drogba and Lampard did and still make a lot of money.

 

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3 hours ago, 11Drogba said:

An accountant might work for 40 years and could still end up in debt. Chelsea players grandchildren's children will not worry about money.

So you are saying Drogba and Lampard should have left when they were 28 if they received a bigger salary offer from Qatar or China. I am pretty sure they would not exchange any salary increase to a CL win. Players who win the biggest trophies, they get both money and personal satisfaction. After they win the trophies, they can always go to China or US like Drogba and Lampard did and still make a lot of money.

 

I wouldnt be too sure on the first point. Adriano made huge bucks a decade ago, and is now living back in a favela like he never did anything. You can never really be sure when you give a kid so much money early in life.

 

Lampard never had to worry about money. His dad was a footballer, his uncle managers at the highest level, and he himself went to a boarding school that charges like 20 thousand pound a year. Thats nearly as much as the  average UK full time worker will make in an entire year(~27k going by government figures). Thats a far cry from 100 pound a month as a school drop out. Drogba was a married University student in France with a kid(quarter-life crisis) who dropped everything to give football a chance as a last ditch effort in chasing his dream. A bit different from Costa's situation too, although he himself admitted he was swayed by other clubs and money more than once, and even considered leaving after Mourinho was sacked the first time. I do agree that there is a satisfaction that exists on winning the biggest trophy.  It becomes interesting when a cab in China can come and offer you stupid money the way they have with costa though.

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On 13/05/2017 at 11:55 AM, Azpinator said:

Diego Costa in a nutshell:

 

 

Absolutely love it.....

Thought Diego could'nt speak Engrish lol

hes1ofus

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Well, I thought he will obviously start against Arsenal, but Batman might have a good chance to start, and if he score, I don't see any point to sub him out, so we maybe have seen the last of Costa playing for Chelsea.

Not the best way to end his Chelsea career sadly, but anyway thanks for all the goal, assist, and money. Good luck, dude. Carry on.

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